How your genes could affect the quality of your marriage

How important is it to consider a romantic partner's genetic profile before getting married?

How important is it to consider a romantic partner's genetic profile before getting married?

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Wired that way: genes do shape behaviors but it’s complicated

The relationship between our genotypes and our psychological traits, while substantial, is highly indirect and emergent.

Photo by Kim Carpenter on Unsplash

Many of our psychological traits are innate in origin. There is overwhelming evidence from twin, family and general population studies that all manner of personality traits, as well as things such as intelligence, sexuality and risk of psychiatric disorders, are highly heritable. Put concretely, this means that a sizeable fraction of the population spread of values such as IQ scores or personality measures is attributable to genetic differences between people. The story of our lives most definitively does not start with a blank page.

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Sex with Neanderthals helped modern humans survive, says study

A new study shows how interbreeding of modern humans and Neanderthals boosted our genomes.

  • Homo Sapiens mated with Neanderthals when they left Africa for Eurasia.
  • Neanderthals developed key genetic adaptations to fighting diseases.
  • Modern humans have 152 genes inherited from the Neanderthals that interact with viruses.
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The first human esophagus grown in a lab

Scientists have grown a model human esophagus using pluripotent stem cells for the first time.

Cincinnati Children's Hospital
  • By precisely timing the application of different chemicals, scientists have grown a small, model esophagus from stem cells.
  • They used the model esophagus to clarify why a certain congenital condition occurs.
  • Using this technique, future researchers will be able to understand the nature of diseases better, develop new treatments, and even repair damaged esophagi.
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Cars Parts Show Us How Some Genetic Stats Mislead

We can “read” genes with ease now, but still can’t say what most of them “mean.” To show why we need clearer “causology” and fitter metaphors, let's scrutinize cars and their parts like we do bodies and genes.

Illustration by Julia Suits, The New Yorker cartoonist & author of The Extraordinary Catalog of Peculiar Inventions

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