Experts fear Thanksgiving COVID spikes—Can you have your turkey and stay healthy too ?

Experts plead with Americans to keep gatherings limited this Thanksgiving, while families devise new ways to celebrate the holidays.

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  • Holiday travel and family gatherings will bolster America's already growing number of coronavirus cases, experts warn.
  • The CDC recommends families celebrating with people outside their quarantine households follow extra precautions.
  • For families staying physically distant, there remain many ways to connect with each other this Thanksgiving.
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    Yes, more and more young adults are living with their parents – but is that necessarily bad?

    Having grown kids still at home is not likely to do you, or them, any permanent harm.

    Photo by Parker Gibbons on Unsplash

    When the Pew Research Center recently reported that the proportion of 18-to-29-year-old Americans who live with their parents has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, perhaps you saw some of the breathless headlines hyping how it's higher than at any time since the Great Depression.

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    Should parents de-emphasize gender norms?

    The color of toys has a much deeper effect on children than some parents may realize.

    • The idea that blue is for boys and pink is for girls plays out in gender reveals and in the toy aisle, but where does it come from and what limits is it potentially placing on children?
    • Lisa Selin Davis traces the gendering of toys and other objects back to the 1920s and explains how, over time, these marketing strategies were falsely conflated with biological traits.
    • The "pink-blue divide" affects boys and girls on a psychological level. For example, psychologists discovered that when girls exit their intense 'pink princess' phase between ages 3-6 and move into a tomboy 'I hate pink' phase at age 6-8 "that is actually a moment of girls realizing that what's marked as feminine is devalued and so they're distancing themselves from it to prop themselves up higher on the ladder," says Selin Davis.
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    Smart parenting: 2 exercises that build confidence in girls

    The ability to speak up and ask will give these future leaders a much needed boost.

    • As the head of an all-girls school in Pennsylvania, Marisa Porges has dedicated her life to educating young women and preparing them for the future.
    • Two things that parents can do at home to build confidence and nurture girls' ability to speak up according to Porges are to have them practice ordering for the family, and to encourage them to develop a pitch when making a request. Providing feedback on the pitch becomes more meaningful and memorable than simply saying yes or no.
    • While this advice is great for parents of boys and girls, it is especially important for parents of young women. A recent study showed that 75 percent of high-performing women executives say they have felt imposter syndrome at some point in their careers. The ability to speak up, ask for what they want, and to use their voices confidently will be valuable skills for these future entrepreneurs and CEOs.

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    Why mothers of tweens – not babies – are the most depressed

    'Little kids, little problems; big kids, big problems.'

    Photo by Farrel Nobel on Unsplash
    The joys of motherhood quite literally wax and wane over time.
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