4 relationship problems that can be linked back to early childhood

An inside look at common relationship problems that link to how we were raised.

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  • Fear of abandonment or other attachment issues can stem from childhood loss (the death of a parent) but can also stem from mistreatment or emotional neglect as a child.
  • Longitudinal studies have proven that a child's inability to maintain healthy relationships may be significantly impaired by having an insecure attachment to a primary caregiver during their early development.
  • While these are common relationship problems that may be rooted in childhood experiences, as adults, we can break the cycle.
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Study: City babies behave better than rural babies

A new study finds the temperament of infants can vary based on where they live.

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  • A new study finds that children raised in urban areas have better temperaments than those living in rural areas.
  • Despite this, parents everywhere are equally stressed.
  • Further studies will look into why this happens.
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Jordan Peterson: Career vs. motherhood: Are women being lied to?

We as a society need to rethink the way we value careers over everything else.

  • Around age 19, women are generally focused on their careers. That changes around the age of 30 when they realize that a career is not the primary purpose of their lives.
  • There are a handful of things that are actually fundamental to life, and if one of them is missing it will get in the way of personal fulfillment.
  • For the women with ambitions to be mothers, teaching them that careers are more important does them a great disservice.

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Why helicopter parenting backfires on kids

Childhood is an important developmental feature of being human. Helicopter parenting disrupts that.

  • "Helicopter parenting, and all of its associated forms, prevents children from exploring their emotional and intellectual landscape, and often their physical landscape as well, such that they become adults in body only," says evolutionary biologist Heather Heying.
  • Childhood is an important developmental stage that trains kids for messy, uncontrollable reality. If adults don't teach kids how to solve their own problems, or if they prevent them from experiencing harm, children become less capable adults who don't know how to deal with real injury and insult.
  • Parents can help their children by teaching them to be anti-fragile. Children grow from being exposed to ideas with which they disagree, encountering negative emotions, and engaging in activities with real-world outcomes like sport, cooking, and DIY.

America’s 'Great Wealth Transfer': How to pass on values and purpose

It's estimated that $68 trillion will pass down from Boomers to millennials. Here's how ultra-rich families can do the most amount of good with what they inherit.

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  • Approximately $68 trillion will pass from boomers to millennials over the next few decades in what's known as the Great Wealth Transfer.
  • 90% of family wealth is gone by the time the third generation comes around, primarily due to familial conflict.
  • Social capital advisor Richard Tafel suggests 4 steps families should follow so they transfer wealth in a way that does the most amount of social good.
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