Mixing human + animal DNA and the future of gene editing

"The question is which are okay, which are not okay."

  • As the material that makes all living things what/who we are, DNA is the key to understanding and changing the world. British geneticist Bryan Sykes and Francis Collins (director of the Human Genome Project) explain how, through gene editing, scientists can better treat illnesses, eradicate diseases, and revolutionize personalized medicine.
  • But existing and developing gene editing technologies are not without controversies. A major point of debate deals with the idea that gene editing is overstepping natural and ethical boundaries. Just because they can, does that mean that scientists should be edit DNA?
  • Harvard professor Glenn Cohen introduces another subcategory of gene experiments: mixing human and animal DNA. "The question is which are okay, which are not okay, why can we generate some principles," Cohen says of human-animal chimeras and arguments concerning improving human life versus morality.

Keep reading Show less

The birth of childhood: A brief history of the European child

Did the 20th century bring a breakthrough in how children are treated?

Jan Steen - A School for Boys and Girls [c.1670]

It took several thousand years for our culture to realize that a child is not an object. Learning how to treat children as humans continues to this day.

Keep reading Show less

7 research-based resolutions that will help strengthen your relationship in the year ahead

Scrap getting fitter or eating better and focus more on the people in your life.

VALERY HACHE/AFP via Getty Images
The new year is going to be better. It has to be better.
Keep reading Show less
Photo by Ga on Unsplash
When one of my co-workers found out about a tiny, orphaned kitten that needed a home a few months ago, he didn't hesitate to adopt it.
Keep reading Show less

The evolution of comfort food

An archaeologist considers the history and biology of what defines a taste of home.

Photo by Zera Li on Unsplash
The winter holiday season will feel different this year for many: Extended families may not be able to gather, leaving holiday meals shared with smaller groups, or digitally, across different time zones.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast