Hubble finds cosmic twin of Solar System's mysterious Planet Nine

Scientists find an exoplanet whose strange behavior may lead to the Solar's System hidden ninth planet.

Credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser
  • NASA's Hubble Telescope provides 14 years of data on the exoplanet HD106906 b.
  • It exhibits strange behavior along its orbit 336 light-year away from Earth.
  • Scientists think data from the exoplanet may explain what happened to the possibly hidden Planet Nine in our Solar System.
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There may be 300 million habitable planets in our galaxy

A new study from NASA and the SETI Institute comes up with an exciting number of potentially life-supporting planets.

Credit: NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle
  • A study analyzes data from the Kepler Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's GAIA survey to estimate the number of habitable planets.
  • There may be 30 such planets in our own galactic neighborhood.
  • The new estimate may help inform future research and missions.
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6 billion planets like Earth? Scientists make stunning estimate

Astronomers propose new estimate of Earth-like planets in the Milky Way galaxy.

Credit: NASA/Ames Research Center/W. Stenzel/D. Rutter
  • Astronomers make new analysis based on data from NASA's Kepler space telescope.
  • The researchers estimate there may be as many as six billion Earth-like planets in our galaxy alone.
  • The scientists looked for planets that would be able to host life.
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The bizarre planets that could be the next hosts of human civilization.

The post Humanity’s New Homes? appeared first on ORBITER.

A Periodic Table of All the Exoplanets Found So Far

The Planetary Habitability Laboratory has made up some periodic tables of all of the confirmed and suspected exoplanets so far, plus planetary bodies in our own solar system.

(PLANETARY HABITABILITY LABORATORY)

Exoplanets are hot right now. In the popularity sense. Thermally, they’re also cold and medium. But ever since the first one was discovered nearly 26 years ago — or 9,457 days as of this writing — we’ve been fascinated by them. Some people are intrigued by the potential any of them may hold for migration from Earth should it become inhabitable. Some wonder if other life on our level could be there. And then there’s their most undeniable value: science. If you’ve been having trouble keeping track of what we’ve found so far, the Planetary Habitability Laboratory (PHL) of the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo has just published its Periodic Table of Exoplanets, which it’ll presumably keep up to date as more of them are found. It’s actually a set of three tables:

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