A Periodic Table of All the Exoplanets Found So Far

The Planetary Habitability Laboratory has made up some periodic tables of all of the confirmed and suspected exoplanets so far, plus planetary bodies in our own solar system.

(PLANETARY HABITABILITY LABORATORY)

Exoplanets are hot right now. In the popularity sense. Thermally, they’re also cold and medium. But ever since the first one was discovered nearly 26 years ago — or 9,457 days as of this writing — we’ve been fascinated by them. Some people are intrigued by the potential any of them may hold for migration from Earth should it become inhabitable. Some wonder if other life on our level could be there. And then there’s their most undeniable value: science. If you’ve been having trouble keeping track of what we’ve found so far, the Planetary Habitability Laboratory (PHL) of the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo has just published its Periodic Table of Exoplanets, which it’ll presumably keep up to date as more of them are found. It’s actually a set of three tables:

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Discoveries in the TRAPPIST-1 System Could "Change the Course of Human History"

Are we alone in the universe? NASA's exploration of TRAPPIST-1 has the potential to answer one of humanity's deepest questions.

When NASA announced the discovery of the TRAPPIST-1 solar system in February 2017, humanity’s collective ears spiked. The system is made up of a dwarf star surrounded by seven "Earth-like" exoplanets at potentially habitable temperatures. If we want to know whether we’re alone in the universe or if we have company, the exploration of this planetary group may get us closer to an answer. Bill Nye explains some key signals NASA’s researchers will be looking for as they focus their intellect, and telescopes, towards this extraordinary next step in our history. Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World.

Bill Nye's most recent book is Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World.

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NASA Discovers 7 New Exoplanets That Could Sustain Life

TRAPPIST-1 is 40 light years from Earth. It would take us millions of years to get there. 

 

The recently announced TRAPPIST-1 solar system. (Image: NASA)

Back in September 2016, NASA announced that nearby exoplanet Proxima b might have what it takes to sustain life. In December however, it announced that it gets bombarded with “super flares” from time to time by its star, Proxima Centauri, and so perhaps isn’t the best candidate. It was a letdown for those of us who marvel at the thought of intelligent life elsewhere in the galaxy, but this latest announcement might just make up for it. The odds are better at least.

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Winston Churchill Believed We Weren’t Alone in the Universe, Newly Found Essay Reveals

Churchill displays a surprising amount of knowledge on a question that we are still wrestling with. 

Winston Churchill is admired for his statesmanship today. Few know he was also a science writer.

Today, Winston Churchill is seen as a cigar chomping, bulldog-faced leader from generations past, adorning offices and college dorms, where he displays a slightly jovial or else dead calm expression, and often, under his visage, stands a quote which inspires and heartens toward perseverance. Churchill was the rallying voice of the British people during some of the darkest days of World War II.

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This is What Our Nearest Exoplanet May Look Like - A Giant Eye Staring at the Sun

The nearest exoplanet ever has been observed, but not yet seen. Is this what the 'Earth Next Door' looks like?

Donald Who? Centuries after this era's headlines are forgotten, 2016 will be remembered as the year we discovered our 'Planet B'. 

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