Here’s what traveling could be like after COVID-19

We will travel again, but it will not be the same.

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COVID-19 has upended global travel and brought the world to a standstill.

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COVID-19: What is the R number?

R is a way of measuring an infectious disease's capacity to spread.

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In just a few short weeks, we've all made the collective journey from pandemic ignoramuses to budding armchair virologists with a decent grasp of once-arcane terms like personal protective equipment, social distancing and "flatten the curve".

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How Apple and Google will let your phone warn you if you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus

Apps that warn about close contact with COVID-19 cases can help relax social distancing rules.

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On April 10, Apple and Google announced a coronavirus exposure notification system that will be built into their smartphone operating systems, iOS and Android. The system uses the ubiquitous Bluetooth short-range wireless communication technology.

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Why does coronavirus kill more men than women? Researchers may have found an important clue.

Men take longer to clear COVID-19 from their systems; a male-only coronavirus repository may be why.

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  • A new study found that women clear coronavirus from their systems much faster than men.
  • The researchers hypothesize that high concentrations of ACE2-expressing cells in the testes may store more coronavirus.
  • There are many confounding factors to this mystery—some genetic, others social and behavioral.
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Report: Just 6% of world's coronavirus infections detected

Researchers argue that most coronavirus infections around the world go undetected.

Credit: KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images.
  • A new paper contends that only 6% of actual coronavirus infections have been detected.
  • Delayed and inadequate testing as well as differences in reporting are to blame.
  • The researchers argue that better testing needs to be set up before social distancing is eased.
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