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Photo: Mark Wilson via Getty Images
  • Nikki Haley has resigned as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
  • Haley didn't offer a clear reason why she's stepping down, but said "it's time."
  • The resignation reportedly came as a surprise to many White House officials, though Trump said she first floated the idea of stepping down about six months ago.
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