Only a fifth of countries provide sick pay — the big challenges for work in a pandemic

From a personal point of view and from an economic point of view, this is nothing short of potentially disastrous for people's livelihoods.

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Making sure that sick people get the care they need and don't infect others is one of the key planks of containing COVID-19 - but the majority of the world's workers have little choice about putting in a shift, even if they feel unwell.

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'Universal basic income is a brilliant idea'. Here's why.

The welfare state is broken. UBI is the smarter, more effective option.

  • The welfare state is an ineffective and expensive system that hurts and targets the poor more than it helps. Universal basic income is a better alternative that could work.
  • The question becomes, then, where would the money for UBI come from? There are a myriad of reasons why UBI via taxes would be a bad idea. Instead, we should look to socially produced capital.
  • Companies rely on people to be successful, so a percentage of all shares of all companies should go into a public equity trust and the dividends should be distributed to every member of society equally.

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How will COVID-19 impact the economy?

Economics professor Stephen M. Miller shares his insights in this exclusive interview.

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  • Stephen M. Miller, director of the Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, gives insight into how the COVID-19 pandemic impacts American economies.
  • Calling it a "trade-off between public health and economic health," Miller explains why social distancing is a necessary measure to avoid a total crash of economies.
  • The SIR model, which is a guide to assessing how much of the population is actively infected, shows what could happen if the active cases of infection goes above 10% of the population.
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As the coronavirus continues to spread around the world, it is abundantly clear that the global economy is entering a recession – the first we've seen since 2008.

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Why are workers getting smaller pieces of the pie?

"Superstar" firms have been lowering labor's share of GDP in recent decades, a new study finds.

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It's one of the biggest economic changes in recent decades: Workers get a smaller slice of company revenue, while a larger share is paid to capital owners and distributed as profits.
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