FAA warns that illegal weaponized drones will incur a $25K fine

The FAA is not amused by flame-throwing drones.

Image source: ThrowFlame
  • Federal Aviation Administration publishes a notice warning the public not to weaponize their personal drones.
  • Doing so will result in a $25,000 fine per violation.
  • The FAA is keeping pace with the rapid development of this new and popular technology.
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The surveillance technology that will watch us all, all the time

Wide Angle Motion Imagery (WAMI) is a surveillance game-changer. And it's here.

Photo by Stanislav Krasilnikov\TASS via Getty Images
  • In his new book, Eyes in the Sky, Arthur Holland Michel details the evolution of aerial surveillance technology.
  • Cameras aboard drones can monitor the entirety of 50 square kilometers for hours without refueling.
  • New aerial technologies will create the privacy fights of the future.
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Amazon’s 'adora-bots' are now making deliveries

The first wave of the retailer's anticipated automated delivery fleet hits the sidewalks.

Image source: Amazon
  • After testing near company HQ, delivery robots are rolling up to random customers' homes in Irvine, CA.
  • The cute little carriers — dubbed "adora-bots" — are already adept at navigating people, pets, and other tricky obstacles.
  • These may be the droids the shipping industry seeks.
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U.S. Army to deploy tiny helicopter drones in Afghanistan

The drones are nearly silent and are able to identify and track enemy soldiers.

FLIR Systems Inc.
  • The U.S. army plans to start using the tiny, helicopter-like drones sometime this month in Afghanistan.
  • The drones are manufactured in the U.S. and would be used for surveillance.
  • Drones are becoming more affordable and accessible, which presents unprecedented threats.
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Perpetual flight: The incredible technology behind nonstop drones

Modern life hinges on satellite connectivity. President of Kraus Aerospace Fatema Hamdani explains how the science of perpetual flight is unfolding, and how to defend satellites and drones from enemy fire.

  • How far can a drone fly? Kraus Aerospace is developing nonstop drones powered by cutting edge technology, like A.I. that recognizes thermal columns so drones can soar like birds rather than actively expending thrust energy.
  • Watch drone footage in the video above to see this technology in action! These drones can also be hand-launched.
  • Fatema Hamdani, cofounder and president of Kraus Aerospace, explains the enormous cost of landing and relaunching drones and satellites, and why nonstop performance is a desirable alternative. It also has applications in national security and disaster relief: "[With this tech] we would have been able to bring up Puerto Rico from them not having connectivity for months or a whole year, to days," she says.