How whales grew to be gigantic

A new study discovers why whales grew to be the largest animals on our planet.

A Humpback whale jumps in the surface of the Pacific Ocean at the Uramba Bahia Malaga natural park in Colombia, on July 16, 2013. (Photo credit: LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)
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She wouldn't last a second.

Who can forget the nail-biting scene in Jurassic Park when an escaped T-Rex, in the middle of a thunderstorm, proceeds to turn over and tear apart a Range Rover with two children trapped inside? Movie magic and real science don't often intersect. So, is this what would really happen, or is Hollywood just ramping up the drama? And how strong was a T. rex's bite anyway? Scientists now know. And the truth is, this terrifying predator retains its reputation. The jaw strength of a T-Rex contained nearly 8,000lbs (3,629kg) of force.

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Scientists are 'blown away' to find a feathered dinosaur tail preserved in amber

A 99-million-year-old dinosaur tail with feathers was examined in a new study by an international team of researchers.

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