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David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
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Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
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Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
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Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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New AI can identify you by your dancing “fingerprint”

We each have a way of moving to music that is so unique a computer can use it to identify us.

Photo by David Redfern / Staff via Getty Images
  • The way we dance to music is so signature to an individual that a computer can now identify us by our unique dancing "fingerprint" with over 90 percent accuracy.
  • The AI had a harder time identifying dancers who were trying to dance to metal and jazz music.
  • Researchers say they are interested in what the results of this study reveal about human response to music, rather than potential surveillance uses.
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The surest path to success is not aiming for success

The Zen of choreographer Merce Cunningham comes alive in a new documentary about his life.

Photo by Miko Malkshasyan / Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures
  • In Cunningham, director Alla Kovgan brings the avant-garde dancer to life.
  • Merce Cunningham's seven-decade career left behind some of the most important modern dances in the twentieth century.
  • In this interview with Big Think, Kovgan discusses how she approached the film while sharing Cunningham's ideas about success.
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Move over, math. The universal language is world music.

A new study finds that societies use the same acoustic features for the same types of songs, suggesting universal cognitive mechanisms underpinning world music.

  • Every culture in the world creates music, though stylistic diversity hides their core similarities.
  • A new study in Science finds that cultures use identifiable acoustic features in the same types of songs and that tonality exists worldwide.
  • Music is one of hundreds of human universals ethnographers have discovered.
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The dancing species: How moving together in time helps make us human

"In so far as bodily movements build the brain, every movement a human makes matters."

Ian Gavan/Getty Images

Dancing is a human universal, but why?

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What were the 'dancing plagues' of the Middle Ages?

Throughout history, hundreds — sometimes thousands — of people have been spontaneously compelled to dance until collapsing or dying from exhaustion. What explanations are there for this bizarre phenomenon?

Wikimedia Commons
  • In 1518, Strasbourg, 400 men and women danced until collapsing from exhaustion.
  • These "dancing plagues" occurred throughout the Middle Ages.
  • Similar spontaneous, mass compulsions have occurred throughout history, some very recently. What are they, and why do they happen?
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