Can psychedelics help treat pain?

Forthcoming Phase II trials with ibogaine aim to find out.

Photo by Joe Amon/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images
  • Pharmacology professor Richard J. Miller is hopeful for the resurgence in clinical studies of psychedelics.
  • Ibogaine, used in France for decades, is making a comeback in potentially helping curb addiction and treat pain.
  • Psychedelics were deemed illegal for political and not medical reasons, an error we are reinvestigating.
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Genius Series: Why Schrödinger's cat is the ultimate reality check

Big Think has just launched its Genius Series of tees, sweatshirts, posters and more! Buy here.

  • Big Think has just launched its Genius Series of tees, sweatshirts, posters and more! Buy here.
  • In this design, we pay tribute to the ultimate reality check in physics: Schrödinger's cat!
  • Erwin Schrödinger was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist. Other geniuses in this series include Nikola Tesla, Marie Curie and Isaac Newton.
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Genius Series: The defiant life of Marie Curie

Big Think has launched a line of apparel and goods that celebrate the life and work of four geniuses.

  • Big Think has just launched its Genius Series of tees, sweatshirts, posters and more!
  • We're paying tribute to the first female Nobel Prize winner, Marie Curie.
  • Select Rush or Super Rush Delivery to get your order before Christmas Day!
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Humans are exposed to 44 times as much BPA as previously assumed

A new method of measuring human exposure to the potentially toxic chemical calls into question regulatory policy.

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  • Bisphenol A, or BPA, is produced at a massive scale in order to manufacture plastics.
  • It's been linked to a wide variety of negative health effects, but regulatory agencies have mainly left the chemical alone due to its usefulness and the low exposure levels found in humans.
  • However, a new study found that the method that most researchers have used to measure BPA exposure in humans drastically underestimates the actual exposure.
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The TESS satellite caught a comet ‘burp'

What happens after a heavy comet meal?

Image source: Farnham et al./NASA
  • A comet produces and unexpected explosive ejection of ice, dust, and gas.
  • NASA's TESS satellites captures the whole thing by accident.
  • The "burp" may have left a crater 65 feet across. That's quite a burp.
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