People with large brain reserves can circumvent Alzheimer's. Here's how to build yours.

It's never too late to start strengthening your brain.

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  • Cognitive reserve is your mind's ability to resist damage to your brain.
  • Brain reserve refers to the brain structures that provide resilience against neurodegenerative diseases.
  • A certain number of people with Alzheimer's pathology never show symptoms; there are methods for developing this skill.
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Being disagreeable shown to help fight Alzheimer's disease

Unique research out of Switzerland says be kind, just not too kind.

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  • Researchers from Switzerland followed 65 senior citizens over five years and tested their personality traits.
  • Being curious and curmudgeonly appears to help stave off Alzheimer's disease.
  • The researchers point to nonconformist attitudes as a potential trait that helps keep seniors independent.
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Vaccine revolution: Curing Alzheimer's from the inside

Could Alzheimer's be prevented with a simple vaccine? This startup posits that it can.

Could Alzheimer's—a devastating degenerative disease that affects millions of people a year—be prevented with a simple vaccine? Lou Reese, the co-founder of start-up United Neuroscience, believes that it's a very real possibility that we could see within our lifetime. And it might even help us live longer, because as Lou puts it, "the largest gains in human longevity ever are debatably attributed to vaccine technology."

Playing Super Mario 64 Increases Brain Health in Adults

For older adults, playing video games isn't just a way for older adults to keep in touch with the younger generation — it might be also be a way to stay in touch with memory itself.

The perennially awesome Mario and the antagonist Bowser, about to duel.

For older adults, playing video games isn't just a way to stay in touch with the younger generation — it might also be a way to stay in touch with perception itself.

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Being married linked to better cognitive function, researchers say

Research points to many social-cognitive, emotional, behavioral and biological benefits that marriage seems to bestow on its participants.

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