Not enough sleep throws your circadian rhythm, leading to potential cognitive problems

Sleep deprivation leads to a shutdown in the production of essential proteins.

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  • Two new studies indicate what happens when your natural circadian rhythm is disrupted by not enough sleep.
  • The production of essential proteins is disrupted by a lack of sleep, which could result in cognitive decline.
  • From dementia to an uptick in obesity, sleep deprivation wreaks havoc in your physiology.
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What is free will, really? Steven Pinker explains.

The processes behind our ability to make decisions are complex, but they're not miracles.

  • Free will exists, but by no means is it a miracle.
  • We use "free will" to describe the more complex processes by which behavior is selected in the brain. These neurological steps taken to make decisions respect all laws of physics.
  • "Free will wouldn't be worth having or extolling, in moral discussions, if it didn't respond to expectations of reward, punishment, praise, blame," Pinker says.
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Does digital technology make students stupid?

Conventional wisdom believes "screen time" disrupts mental development, but research hints at a more complicated relationship between our minds and digital technology.

  • Worry over test scores has led many to blame digital technology for waning educational achievement.
  • New studies show that the persistent effects of "screen time" are not yet understood and may be short-lived.
  • Many experts argue the best approach is to teach students the strategic and selective use of digital technology.
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The surprising link between sunshine and suicide

Lengthening daylight isn't necessarily good news where mental health is concerned.

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Perception of musical pitch varies across cultures

Is the way we hear music biological or cultural?

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People who are accustomed to listening to Western music, which is based on a system of notes organized in octaves, can usually perceive the similarity between notes that are same but played in different registers — say, high C and middle C.

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