Neil deGrasse Tyson has an unexpected reaction to Trump's Space Force

Neil deGrasse Tyson explains why Trump's Space Force is "not a crazy idea".

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  • The astrophysicist and author Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses why he wanted a Space Force for decades.
  • He doesn't think just because Trump proposed it that the Space Force is "a crazy idea".
  • Tyson sees important non-military functions for the branch.
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Neil deGrasse Tyson Tackles the Science of Game of Thrones

Neil deGrasse Tyson, famous in part for using his scientific literacy to point out flaws in TV and movies, recently criticized the good and bad science behind HBO's Game of Thrones.

Lord Tyson?
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Neil deGrasse Tyson is Developing a Space Exploration Video Game

Neil deGrasse Tyson is working in with video game developers to create a space exploration game called Space Odyssey.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson: Don't believe the dark matter hype

There's something all of us—physicists included—are getting wrong about dark matter, says Neil deGrasse Tyson.

There's something fundamental we all need to understand about dark matter—it may not actually be matter at all. Neil deGrasse Tyson has a bone to pick with this misnomer that is distracting physicists and the public from the real discoveries to be made. Scientists know very little about "dark matter", and in fact it can only be observed indirectly by its effect on other objects. Tyson has a few suggestions for its re-naming: how about "Fred", he jokes, which is a name devoid of any implied meaning—suitable for our current level of knowledge. But if you want it to sound sexy and be accurate, then the way to go is dark gravity, according to Tyson. Why? Because when you add up everything in the universe—the stars, moons, gas clouds, black holes, everything—85% of gravity is unaccounted for. That is so-called "dark matter". What makes it so interesting isn't the wild-goose-chase question of whether or not it exists, but why it doesn't interact with ordinary, known matter? On the way to explaining that dark matter "doesn't give a rats ass about us," Tyson explores ghost particles, the essence of objects, and why we haven't found any dark matter planets. Tyson's new book is Astrophysics for People in a Hurry.

Neil deGrasse Tyson wants to go ice fishing on Europa

Everyone loves Europa, says Neil deGrasse Tyson. Why? It's a strong bet for finding life in our solar system, and it's even more amazing because it breaks all the rules.

Where there is water, there is life—and Europa’s got water alright: scientists believe it has twice the volume of Earth’s oceans swirling beneath its kilometers-thick ice crust. A moon in Jupiter’s massive orbit, Europa has captivated astrophysicists, including Neil deGrasse Tyson, because it has completely blown open the borders in the search for life in our universe. Europa is well outside of the life-supporting "Goldilocks Zone". Tyson explains how liquid water can exist in such a frozen part of our solar system, and how engineers might approach getting through all that ice to potentially come face to face/membrane with life, whether simple or complex. It won’t be too long before NASA’s ‘Europa Clipper’ mission makes its move to investigate the habitability of the icy moon: it will head for Europa in the 2020s. Tyson's new book is Astrophysics for People in a Hurry.

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