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Daniel Altman

Chief Economist, Big Think

Daniel Altman is Big Think's Chief Economist and an adjunct faculty member at New York University's Stern School of Business.  Daniel wrote economic commentary for The Economist, The New York Times, and The International Herald Tribune before founding North Yard Economics, a non-profit consulting firm serving developing countries, in 2008.  In between, he served as an economic advisor in the British government and wrote four books, most recently Outrageous Fortunes: The Twelve Surprising Trends That Will Reshape the Global Economy.

Is the Best Yet to Come?

The United States still has problems to resolve, but it is on a stronger economic footing than before the crisis.

In Bernanke We Trust

If the Fed still has room to juice the economy without threatening price stability, why doesn’t it? 

Why Do Economic Forecasters Still Have Jobs?

Once again, the Wall Street Journal has published its annual ranking of economic forecasters. Using methods developed with the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, the newspaper calculated which forecasters made […]

Another BRIC in the Wall?

What’s the Big Idea? Ten years after Goldman Sachs dubbed the countries Brazil, Russia, India and China BRICs, what does this term still mean? How have these economies changed? Are […]

BRIC or Bric-à-brac?

It’s been more than ten years since the folks at Goldman Sachs dubbed Brazil, Russia, India, and China the BRIC countries, and lately other countries have been trying to glom […]
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Post-Scarcity Does Not Mean Post-Work

Does the rise of the robots doom us all to unemployment? The answer is most certainly no. Provocative claims that the United States has reached “peak jobs” and will soon […]

The Women Who Were Right About the Economy

Who could have saved us from the global financial crisis? In a word, women. The release of the Federal Reserve’s transcripts of policymaking meetings up to 2007 has shed new […]

China: From Drag to Dragon

"China has allowed the Yuan to appreciate in value against the dollar and Euro and other major currencies," Daniel Altman says, "and now there are very few analysts who would say that it's artificially depressed."

More Spending That Pays for Itself

While the Congress debates sequestration and other ways of trimming spending in specific departments and agencies, it should not miss the tremendous opportunity now presented by the financial markets.

Taxation in Theory and Reality

The debate over the fiscal cliff has spawned a multitude of suggestions for reforming the tax system, including my own.  One possible reason for the wide range of proposals, even from mainstream economists, is that the recommendations of standard economic theory may be very different from what the American economy actually needs today.  Here are two views of taxation, from the theoretical and realistic standpoints – can you find a happy medium between them?

The Cult of the Singularity

Friends, a new world is waiting for all of us. It is a world without want, where every need is satisfied by boundless resources. It is a world of friendship, […]