Why President Trump wants a military parade in Washington D.C.

President Donald Trump has requested that the U.S. armed forces stage a parade in the nation's capital to feature America's military might. The timing and source of the request has drawn a mixture of opinion.

According to the Washington Post, President Donald Trump has requested that the U.S. armed forces stage a parade in the nation's capital to feature America's military might. The timing and source of the request has drawn a mixture of opinion from high-ranking individuals. 


While opinion over the prospect of a military parade in the near future divides along partisan lines, there are some important distinctions worth considering—and recalling the place of the military in the life of a nation, for better or worse.

Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers laments the image such a parade would create and that we seek to imitate France in "military domain", a joke at the expense of French military history.

I’m all for the US flag and totally behind the US military. I loathe those who favor cosmopolitanism over patriotism. But military parades bespeak a leader’s insecurity not true patriotism. Why, in military domain, are we trying to emulate France?

— Lawrence H. Summers (@LHSummers) February 7, 2018

Desert Storm was hailed as the biggest American victory since the Cold War—and biggest military victory since World War II. The parade in its honor featured stealth fighter planes, tanks and Patriot missiles, and 8,000 battle-clad troops marching through Washington D.C.

Washington DC June 8-1991: A flag-waving crowd of 200,000 Saturday cheered veterans of Operation Desert Storm as the nation's capital staged its biggest victory celebration since the end of World War II. Stealth fighter planes zoomed overhead, tanks and Patriot missiles rolled by and more than 8,000 battle-clad troops marched past a beaming President Bush in a display of the American military might that crushed Iraq in 43 days of combat. (Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images)

 

The tradition of military parades, to be sure, has deep roots in western civilization. Rome's armies famously re-entered the city through its arches after successful military campaigns, uniting Romans in celebration (and teaching leaders eager for public support one effective way of winning it).

The President's desire to display American military muscle, however, apparently comes from his viewing of France's Bastille Day military parade, an annual event which commemorates the storming of a Paris prison to gain stocks of weapons and gunpowder at the start of the French Revolution. 

In the American consciousness, military parades are more likely to recall the Soviet Union and despotic nations like North Korea which held its own military parade recently as the 2018 Winter Olympics are set to begin in South Korea.

This April 15, 2017 picture released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on April 16, 2017 shows Korean People's howitzers being displayed through Kim Il-Sung square during a military parade in Pyongyang marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

--

Big Think Edge
  • The meaning of the word 'confidence' seems obvious. But it's not the same as self-esteem.
  • Confidence isn't just a feeling on your inside. It comes from taking action in the world.
  • Join Big Think Edge today and learn how to achieve more confidence when and where it really matters.
Videos
  • Prejudice is typically perpetrated against 'the other', i.e. a group outside our own.
  • But ageism is prejudice against ourselves — at least, the people we will (hopefully!) become.
  • Different generations needs to cooperate now more than ever to solve global problems.


Active ingredient in Roundup found in 95% of studied beers and wines

The controversial herbicide is everywhere, apparently.

(MsMaria/Shutterstock)
Surprising Science
  • U.S. PIRG tested 20 beers and wines, including organics, and found Roundup's active ingredient in almost all of them.
  • A jury on August 2018 awarded a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma victim $289 million in Roundup damages.
  • Bayer/Monsanto says Roundup is totally safe. Others disagree.
Keep reading Show less

Scientists see 'rarest event ever recorded' in search for dark matter

The team caught a glimpse of a process that takes 18,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 years.

Image source: Pixabay
Surprising Science
  • In Italy, a team of scientists is using a highly sophisticated detector to hunt for dark matter.
  • The team observed an ultra-rare particle interaction that reveals the half-life of a xenon-124 atom to be 18 sextillion years.
  • The half-life of a process is how long it takes for half of the radioactive nuclei present in a sample to decay.
Keep reading Show less