Study: People who need to wear glasses are more intelligent

People who displayed higher intelligence were 28% more likely to wear glasses.

Kate-Upton-Glasses-JFK
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 19: Kate Upton is seen arriving at JFK Airport at Streets of Manhattan on November 19, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Alo Ceballos/FilmMagic)

Wearing glasses? You're in luck. A major study, published in the journal of Nature Communications, has proven what many of us have already suspected: wearing glasses really is a sign of intelligence. 


The University of Edinburgh analyzed data from over 300,000 people and found a correlation between overall intelligence and wearing glasses, with a link between general cognitive function and poor eyesight. People who displayed higher intelligence were 28% more likely to wear glasses. 

The findings were part of a much broader study about inherited genes affecting general cognitive function (or, colloquially, "intelligence"). The study also found that those with higher cognitive function tended to live longer, have a decreased risk of specific types of cancer, and even had healthier hearts. 

Does this mean you should go out and buy a pair of glasses, even if you don't need them? Absolutely not. A 2010 study shows that fake glasses overwhelmingly tend to make wearers more dishonest. Not only that, but fake glasses can even change your basic self-perception... even GQ calls this practice "downright shameful." A good half-way point might be just to get a pair of so-called computer glasses, like Felix Grays, which cut down on blue light (i.e. the thing that is emanating from your computer screen and screws with your circadian rhythm). 

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