Study: People who need to wear glasses are more intelligent

People who displayed higher intelligence were 28% more likely to wear glasses.

Kate-Upton-Glasses-JFK
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 19: Kate Upton is seen arriving at JFK Airport at Streets of Manhattan on November 19, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Alo Ceballos/FilmMagic)

Wearing glasses? You're in luck. A major study, published in the journal of Nature Communications, has proven what many of us have already suspected: wearing glasses really is a sign of intelligence. 


The University of Edinburgh analyzed data from over 300,000 people and found a correlation between overall intelligence and wearing glasses, with a link between general cognitive function and poor eyesight. People who displayed higher intelligence were 28% more likely to wear glasses. 

The findings were part of a much broader study about inherited genes affecting general cognitive function (or, colloquially, "intelligence"). The study also found that those with higher cognitive function tended to live longer, have a decreased risk of specific types of cancer, and even had healthier hearts. 

Does this mean you should go out and buy a pair of glasses, even if you don't need them? Absolutely not. A 2010 study shows that fake glasses overwhelmingly tend to make wearers more dishonest. Not only that, but fake glasses can even change your basic self-perception... even GQ calls this practice "downright shameful." A good half-way point might be just to get a pair of so-called computer glasses, like Felix Grays, which cut down on blue light (i.e. the thing that is emanating from your computer screen and screws with your circadian rhythm). 

Archaeologists discover 3,200-year-old cheese in ancient Egyptian tomb

A team of archaeologists has discovered 3,200-year-old cheese after analyzing artifacts found in an ancient Egyptian tomb. It could be the oldest known cheese sample in the world.

The broken jar in which the white mass of cheese was found. (Photo: University of Catania and Cairo University)
Culture & Religion

Keep reading Show less

Modern society is as unequal as 14th century Europe

As bad as this sounds, a new essay suggests that we live in a surprisingly egalitarian age.

"Philosophy Presenting the Seven Liberal Arts to Boethius"

Getty Open Content
Politics & Current Affairs
  • A new essay depicts 700 years of economic inequality in Europe.
  • The only stretch of time more egalitarian than today was the period between 1350 to approximately the year 1700.
  • Data suggest that, without intervention, inequality does not decrease on its own.
Keep reading Show less

You are suffering from “tab overload”

Our love-hate relationship with browser tabs drives all of us crazy. There is a solution.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
Technology & Innovation
  • A new study suggests that tabs can cause people to be flustered as they try to keep track of every website.
  • The reason is that tabs are unable to properly organize information.
  • The researchers are plugging a browser extension that aims to fix the problem.
Keep reading Show less
Personal Growth

Epicurus and the atheist's guide to happiness

Seek pleasure and avoid pain. Why make it more complicated?

Quantcast