Van Gogh's Missing Ear Regrown Using 3D Printer

A German artist has taken some of Vincent Van Gogh's genetic material and used it to regrow the ear he famously cut off during a psychotic episode in 1888.

What's the Latest?


A German artist has taken some of Vincent Van Gogh's genetic material and used it to regrow the ear he famously cut off during a psychotic episode in 1888. The ear, which sits floating in a biological solution meant to preserve the fragile tissue, is currently on display at a museum in Karlsruhe, Germany. "The Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe says the replica ear consists of living cells grown from samples provided by Lieuwe van Gogh, the great-great-grandson of Vincent's brother Theo. The museum says Lieuwe and Vincent van Gogh share about 1/16th of the same genes, including the Y-chromosome that is passed down the male lineage."

What's the Big Idea?

A biological 3D printer was used to create the organ which is expected to last for several years before the tissue dissolves away. Diemut Strebe, the artist, said her objective was to combine the expressive capabilities of art with the ingenuity of science. "I use science basically like a type of brush, like Vincent used paint," she said. Work is currently underway to source genetic material--mitochondrial DNA--passed down through Vincent's maternal line for use in future installations. Strebe is planning to display the ear in New York next year.

Read more at Al Jazeera

Archaeologists unearth dozens of mummified cats in Egypt

Dozens of mummified cats were dug up this week. This isn't as shocking as you might think.

KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images
Culture & Religion
  • Archaeologists in Egypt have found dozens of mummified cats in the tomb of a royal offical.
  • The cats will join the ranks of hundreds of thousands of previously discovered ancient kitties.
  • While the cats are nothing special, the tomb also held well preserved beetles.
Keep reading Show less

Men obsessed with building muscle mass have higher mental health risks

They're at a higher risk for depression, weekend binge drinking, and unnecessary dieting.

Palestinian participants flex their muscles during a bodybuilding competition in Gaza city on October 28, 2016. / AFP / MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
Mind & Brain
  • Body dysmorphia is not limited to women, a new study from Norway and Cambridge shows.
  • Young men that focus on building muscle are at risk for a host of mental and physical health problems.
  • Selfie culture is not helping the growing number of teens that are anxious and depressed.
Keep reading Show less

A.I. turns 57 million crop fields into stunning abstract art

Detailed (and beautiful) information on 57 million crop fields across the U.S. and Europe are now available online.

Image: OneSoil
Strange Maps
  • Using satellite images and artificial intelligence, OneSoil wants to make 'precision farming' available to the world.
  • The start-up from Belarus has already processed the U.S. and Europe, and aims for global coverage by 2020.
  • The map is practical, and more — browse 'Random Beautiful Fields' at the touch of a button.
Keep reading Show less