Human and Machine to Merge at For Humankind – a Bing/Big Think Co-Production

On June 30-July 1, Bing and Big Think present For Humankind, a weekend-long science, technology and design pop-up expo at 201 Mulberry Street, New York City. Here we will spotlight those ideas, communities and devices that integrate into our lives, capitalize on our unique strengths, and amplify the best of human nature. 


We'll also be announcing the three winners of the Humanizing Technology Prize, in the categories of Self-Help, Human Relationships, and Safety & Security

Join us for an exciting, interactive exploration of what it means to be human – today and far into the future. 

The event is the culmination of Humanizing Technology, an online expo we launched back in April, exploring the evolving relationship between humankind and the technology we create. 

Humanizing Technology has inspired some of the most fascinating interviews ever featured on Big Think, including: 

  • Jaron Lanier on Why Facebook Isn't Free
  • Jonah Lehrer on The Creative Insight of the Outsider
  • Neil DeGrasse Tyson on Scientific Curiosity as a Human Birthright
  • and Radiolab's Jad Abumrad on the Art and Science of Digital Shamanism
  • The central question of the series and the For Humankind expo is this: Given that technology is rapidly and drastically changing the way we live, how do we want to live with technology? It emerges from our belief that while technology is morally neutral, it is imperative that we take an active stance in guiding its use and development in directions that enhance the best of human nature.

    Being an educated consumer isn't enough; we also need to be producers, applying technology wisely and creatively to better ourselves, our relationships, and our world. 


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