Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Safe? New research confirms the toxic effect of vaping

A study at the University of Birmingham shows the effect of vaping liquid after being inhaled, and it's not good.

Photo by Ryan J Lane / Getty Images

Here we go again.


Advocates for a “healthier" alternative to cigarettes took another hit from a recent study published in the journal, Thorax. A number of previous studies have focused on e-cigarette liquid before being vaped. For this research, University of Birmingham coauthor Dr. David Thickett, a professor in the Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, investigated the effects on the lungs after inhalation.

Thickett and his team took tissue samples from eight nonsmokers to study the effects of the liquid over the next 48 hours. They discovered that the vapor causes the production of inflammatory cytokines, as well as the inhibition of a cellular “safety device," phagocytosis. Simply put:

We show a significant increase in cytotoxicity caused by the vaping process itself.

Cytokines are a broad group of proteins that affect local cells. They are particularly critical in the functioning of the immune system. They help determine the body's response to a host of potential issues, including cancer, sepsis, trauma, and, as this study shows, inflammation.

Vaping increases inflammatory behavior in lung tissue cells. It also decreases the efficacy of a process called phagocytosis, in which pathogens and cell debris are removed from the immune system. As the inflammatory cell response is increasing, the very mechanism that helps combat it is silenced.

The popularity of vaping continues, however. In 2017, over one-quarter of high school seniors and 13 percent of eighth graders claimed they vaped. Research shows that college freshmen who vape are more likely to indulge in cigarettes as well. But when a company like Juul is valued at $16 billion, chances that we'll slow down are slim.

And so the debate regarding the safety of cigarettes versus e-cigs continues. Thickett notes that there are still fewer carcinogens in the vaping liquid. In this sense, vaping appears safer than cigarettes. Yet Thickett says that in 20 or 30 years time, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains a real possibility for e-cig users.

I don't believe e-cigarettes are more harmful than ordinary cigarettes. But we should have a cautious scepticism that they are as safe as we are being led to believe.

The authors of the study also note that they have not studied the flavors used in vaping liquid, which could promote further toxic effects. The lesson remains: nothing goes into your lungs without consequence. The question is how much of a risk you're willing to take.

--

Stay in touch with Derek on Facebook and Twitter.

Remote learning vs. online instruction: How COVID-19 woke America up to the difference

Educators and administrators must build new supports for faculty and student success in a world where the classroom might become virtual in the blink of an eye.

Credit: Shutterstock
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • If you or someone you know is attending school remotely, you are more than likely learning through emergency remote instruction, which is not the same as online learning, write Rich DeMillo and Steve Harmon.
  • Education institutions must properly define and understand the difference between a course that is designed from inception to be taught in an online format and a course that has been rapidly converted to be offered to remote students.
  • In a future involving more online instruction than any of us ever imagined, it will be crucial to meticulously design factors like learner navigation, interactive recordings, feedback loops, exams and office hours in order to maximize learning potential within the virtual environment.
Keep reading Show less

Octopus-like creatures inhabit Jupiter’s moon, claims space scientist

A leading British space scientist thinks there is life under the ice sheets of Europa.

Jupiter's moon Europa has a huge ocean beneath its sheets of ice.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute
Surprising Science
  • A British scientist named Professor Monica Grady recently came out in support of extraterrestrial life on Europa.
  • Europa, the sixth largest moon in the solar system, may have favorable conditions for life under its miles of ice.
  • The moon is one of Jupiter's 79.
Keep reading Show less

White dwarfs hold key to life in the universe, suggests study

New study shows white dwarf stars create an essential component of life.

White dwarfs.

NASA and H. Richer (University of British Columbia)
Surprising Science
  • White dwarf stars create carbon atoms in the Milky Way galaxy, shows new study.
  • Carbon is an essential component of life.
  • White dwarfs make carbon in their hot insides before the stars die.
Keep reading Show less

"Forced empathy" is a powerful negotiation tool. Here's how to do it.

Master negotiator Chris Voss breaks down how to get what you want during negotiations.

Juan Carlos Correa (L) , a prospective home buyer is shown a short sale home by Denise Madan, a Real Estate agent with Re/Max, as he shops for a house on April 22, 2014 in Coral Gables, Florida.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Personal Growth
  • Former FBI negotiator Chris Voss explains how forced empathy is a powerful negotiating tactic.
  • The key is starting a sentence with "What" or "How," causing the other person to look at the situation through your eyes.
  • What appears to signal weakness is turned into a strength when using this tactic.
Keep reading Show less
Scroll down to load more…
Quantcast