Nikola Tesla and the Inconceivable Grandeur of Nature

"A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably complex are the processes in Nature." — Nikola Tesla, 1893

Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was a pioneer scientist during the turn of the 20th century best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system. Tesla was a physicist, mechanical and electric engineer, inventor, and futurist, as well as the possessor of a near-eidetic memory. He spoke eight languages and held 300 patents by the end of his life. His legacy has experienced a major resurgence in recent years — the name Tesla, as you might have heard, is way in vogue right now — as many of his predictions have inspired the search for wireless, unlimited supplies of power.


The quote below does well to express Tesla's unbounded sense of wonder with regard to Nature and the universe:

"A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably complex are the processes in Nature." — Nikola Tesla, 1893

The world is full of Tesla fans and devotees, although the most notable is almost certainly Elon Musk. Check out the video below featuring the Tesla CEO:

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