Transcendent Social Media: Watching the World Cup Like Never Before

Transcendent Social Media: Watching the World Cup Like Never Before


Last weekend, I sat down with a billion other people from across the globe to watch Germany battle Argentina for the World Cup final. In actuality, I was sitting in a room with seven of my close friends, but we all knew that we were a part of an event that had true global significance. So we gasped and cheered in tandem with millions of other fans around the world

Due to the wonder of our smart phones, however, this game was unlike any other that I had ever experienced before. While I’m used to at least half the people in a room looking at their phones at any given time, I was struck by the extra dimension that digital technology added to the game. Of course, the usual fact-finding and Googling occurred: “Wow, how tall is Germany’s goalie? That guy is a beast! Oh…Wikipedia says he’s 6’4”, guys.”  But with Facebook and Twitter, a second type of mobile activity also emerged: People in the room were watching the game from two different perspectives. One perspective was provided by the live event on the television. This was carefully crafted and scripted by the TV gods that oversee each and every moment of our viewing lives. The other perspective was an amalgamation of hundreds—or even thousands—of other points of view that were present in our social feeds. This allowed us to experience each penalty and play as well as the chaos of Maracaña Stadium from the safety of our living rooms or one of millions packed bars worldwide.

I chuckled as I saw the Instagram photos of a popular YouTube personality running across the manicured green grass of the stadium. I felt like I was living vicariously through the words of a close friend who described the moods of both teams from inside the stadium. Dozens of these kinds of moments captivated me (and the rest of the room) in the midst of the game.

While I’ve been critical of technology’s effect on our ability to be mindful, there was something different, something almost magical, about the global participation that the World Cup fostered for that two-hour period. In the past, the realization of synchronicity would have been relegated to my imagination—“I understand that hundreds of millions of people are watching this game.” Today, however, we’re able to tangibly peek into other people’s lives through photos, videos, text, and audio. We’re able to simultaneously cheer with our friends and a myriad of faceless fans through thousands of tiny camera lenses and microphones scattered about the planet—

and it feels more like a shared experience in this case, rather than a voyeuristic one.

Usually, social media is a hodgepodge of activity with no consistent theme or topic. During the World Cup final, however, almost every single post and story was about this singular event of immense interest and importance. On one level, I was multitasking by checking my phone. On another level, I was experiencing this single event from more angles and perspectives than has ever been possible throughout human history.

In a sense, I was in thirty different places that day. But the entire time, I was doing the same thing: rooting for human greatness as I watched it juggle and spin a ball in giant, flowing arcs across a shimmering green field. Looking back on the event, it seems almost unreal. My memories are a patchwork quilt of conversations with my buddies, images from the TV, and snapshots from other people’s eyes. One day, when virtual reality technologies spread through the consumer landscape, this will seem like a rather small and silly thing to brag about. But for now, in these moments of global participation, we can marvel at the fact that we can focus on one thing through millions of pairs of eyes—and we get that much better of a view, if just for a few hours.

 

---

If you liked this article, sign up for Jason's newsletter.

---

Image: Fabiana

How New York's largest hospital system is predicting COVID-19 spikes

Northwell Health is using insights from website traffic to forecast COVID-19 hospitalizations two weeks in the future.

Credit: Getty Images
Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • The machine-learning algorithm works by analyzing the online behavior of visitors to the Northwell Health website and comparing that data to future COVID-19 hospitalizations.
  • The tool, which uses anonymized data, has so far predicted hospitalizations with an accuracy rate of 80 percent.
  • Machine-learning tools are helping health-care professionals worldwide better constrain and treat COVID-19.
Keep reading Show less

Listen: Scientists re-create voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian mummy

Scientists used CT scanning and 3D-printing technology to re-create the voice of Nesyamun, an ancient Egyptian priest.

Surprising Science
  • Scientists printed a 3D replica of the vocal tract of Nesyamun, an Egyptian priest whose mummified corpse has been on display in the UK for two centuries.
  • With the help of an electronic device, the reproduced voice is able to "speak" a vowel noise.
  • The team behind the "Voices of the Past" project suggest reproducing ancient voices could make museum experiences more dynamic.
Keep reading Show less

Dark matter axions possibly found near Magnificent 7 neutron stars

A new study proposes mysterious axions may be found in X-rays coming from a cluster of neutron stars.

A rendering of the XMM-Newton (X-ray multi-mirror mission) space telescope.

Credit: D. Ducros; ESA/XMM-Newton, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO
Surprising Science
  • A study led by Berkeley Lab suggests axions may be present near neutron stars known as the Magnificent Seven.
  • The axions, theorized fundamental particles, could be found in the high-energy X-rays emitted from the stars.
  • Axions have yet to be observed directly and may be responsible for the elusive dark matter.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Put on a happy face? “Deep acting” associated with improved work life

    New research suggests you can't fake your emotional state to improve your work life — you have to feel it.

    Credit: Columbia Pictures
    Personal Growth
  • Deep acting is the work strategy of regulating your emotions to match a desired state.
  • New research suggests that deep acting reduces fatigue, improves trust, and advances goal progress over other regulation strategies.
  • Further research suggests learning to attune our emotions for deep acting is a beneficial work-life strategy.
  • Keep reading Show less
    Surprising Science

    World's oldest work of art found in a hidden Indonesian valley

    Archaeologists discover a cave painting of a wild pig that is now the world's oldest dated work of representational art.

    Scroll down to load more…
    Quantcast