What are the recurring themes in your work?

Question: What are the recurring themes in your work? 

Fritz Haeg: Yeah. I like to think of my work or my practice as it exists to be constantly revealing itself to me, and then periodically checking in on what it is and trying to get my head around it and understand it, so that I can talk about it or so I can nudge it one direction or another, but a lot of times my work develops based on instinct or what I feel needs to happen, what I feel like I am drawn to and allowing myself to go in directions that I am properly qualified or prepare to work in. For example dance is something I am really interested and gardens obviously.  This work with animals, these are directions that I am not necessarily prepared to work in this professional. I wouldn’t be qualify to do, in any regard, but it is something I am really deeply interested in and I think move in towards the practices that is more like an artist where, artist I given latitude to work in any media, about any topic, in a way that no other discipline allows you to necessarily. I intend to do a lot of research in work with a lot of experts in the disciplines that I am getting in the topic that I am getting into, but I think that is been one important part of my work is allowing myself to trespass into areas that I am not qualified to. Also, I am really interested in developing work that isn’t easily categorized and I don’t think that’s something I decided to do consciously, it is just what I have been drawn to or those direction the work is taken, so that depending on who is looking at it or who is talking about it they will categorize it in different ways, and it will allow people in different points of entry into it. So for example, some of the work that I do, its discussed and written about in mainstream press for people who don’t have an art background or don’t know much about contemporary art, so the work isn’t even contextualize art, the gardens for example are probably the animal projects, which is fine. I like the idea of doing almost, I think of it is trogon horse where it is wheeled out, and it invades into the culture with out people being aware where it came from or what its context.

 

Recorded On: 3/10/08

Haeg lets his art evolve on its own.

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