Learning How to Thrive: Redefining Success, with Arianna Huffington

The founder and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post explains why adjusting your perception of success is vital for achieving a healthy work-life balance.

Learning How to Thrive: Redefining Success, with Arianna Huffington

In the video below, Arianna Huffington makes an astute point about how society defines success: 


"We have been living under a collective delusion for a long while now that burnout is necessary for success, that if you really are serious about succeeding, building a company, climbing the career ladder, then you just have to accept that’s going to require burning the candle at both ends."

That's all rubbish, says Huffington. A delusion. There is no such thing as success without a state of sustainable well-being. This is the theme of Huffington's best-selling book Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder, which she wrote upon discovering her own personal need to redefine success. Building on the lessons in Thrive, Huffington explains her four-part framework for work-life balance in a new five-part video workshop available exclusively on Big Think Edge. You can catch a preview just below:

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