New Paths to Leadership Via Values Diversity: a Workshop with Jody Greenstone Miller

The real barrier to getting more women into leadership roles is the issue of time commitment. Companies that embrace values diversity and accommodate various time commitments will open doors to leadership for previously shut-out members of the available talent pool.

New Paths to Leadership Via Values Diversity: a Workshop with Jody Greenstone Miller

The old adage when considering leadership is "the cream will rise to the top." It's commonly understood that the best and most qualified leaders will ascend to the top of a meritocratic system on the strength of their innate executive skillsets. The reason Demographics X, Y, and Z don't see more of their talent pool rise to the top is because they simply don't have the drive to make it.


At least, that's the perception. You either got what it takes or you don't. Is there any semblance of truth there? 

Not really, says executive Jody Greenstone Miller. Her philosophy of values diversity is at the core of a new Big Think Edge workshop focused on helping businesses create new paths to leadership and widening their talent pool. You can view the preview immediately below.

Live on Thursday: Learn innovation with 3-star Michelin chef Dominique Crenn

Dominique Crenn, the only female chef in America with three Michelin stars, joins Big Think Live this Thursday at 1pm ET.

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