The Future of the Universe

If matter attracts matter, then logically, at some point in the future, all matter will contract until it is at a point where it is no longer compressible.


 

Guess (tell me if there is a way to prove/disprove this, just makes sense to me): When all matter reaches the point at which it can no longer contract, it must (?) still continue to attract itself. Since it can no longer contract, would it not generate INCREDIBLE friction? Would this friction not generate heat, and therefore increase the average translational kinetic energy per molecule? If this were to happen, would the non-compressible matter not bounce off of itself, resulting in everything flying apart? Is this not the Big Bang? That would solve the "where" that people are always confused about. The void of the universe would still be there, giving the exploding matter room to expand.

 

I have no way to back this up. It just makes logical sense in my head. I’m not a physicist, and my math is not terrific. I just started to think of the world as simply a pack where a lot of molecules had attracted each other into a mass, the densest settling nearest the center… and then I thought about the universe the same way.

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Image: Our World in Data / CC BY
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