It’s time to switch to a four-day working week, say these two Davos experts

'For decades, all the major economists ... they all believed that we would be working less and less', Rutger Bregman told Davos

Working less would have a range of benefits for workers and employers and the world should embrace the four-day working week, was the message two experts brought to Davos 2019.

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7 top CEOs on the one thing that makes their mornings more productive

No, it doesn't include waking up at 4 a.m.

Photo by Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for THR

Do you wake up and check your email while your eyes are still half closed? If so, you might want to rethink your morning routine. The early hours of the day set the tone for everything to come, so it's no surprise that so many successful people take an intentioned approach to what they do first thing.These hyper-successful CEOs reveal their morning routines that help them prioritize calm, concentration, and the meaningful stuff — without sacrificing productivity.

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How to use tea to biohack your mood, stress, and productivity

Ancient beverages like tea and chamomile can heighten your modern-day performance.

  • Tea was cultivated in China nearly 5,000 years ago.
  • Its molecular makeup makes it the perfect biohack for regulating mood, alertness, and concentration throughout the day.
  • Tea may not be a panacea, but studies suggest promising long-term health benefits.
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15 surprising life lessons from a highly successful 80-year-old

You can use these to get ahead, no matter your age.

Blackstone's Byron Wien, Vice Chairman of Private Wealth Solutions Group, gave a speech laying out the wisdom he learned during his 80 years. Here are 15 of Wien's best life lessons, which teach us about improving our productivity, sleep, burnout avoidance, and everything in between.

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Attention is not a resource but a way of being alive to the world

Our attention is more than just a resource. It is an experience.

'We are drowning in information, while starving for wisdom.' Those were the words of the American biologist E O Wilson at the turn of the century. Fastforward to the smartphone era, and it's easy to believe that our mental lives are now more fragmentary and scattered than ever. The 'attention economy' is a phrase that's often used to make sense of what's going on: it puts our attention as a limited resource at the centre of the informational ecosystem, with our various alerts and notifications locked in a constant battle to capture it.

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