Men who receive paternity leave want fewer children

A new study in Spain displays the powerful effects of empathy.

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  • Men that take paid paternity leave in Spain are less likely to want more children in the future.
  • The study's authors believe that men become more aware of the overall costs of raising children.
  • Before the service was enacted, women spent 4.2 hours engaged in unpaid childcare labor compared to 1.3 hours by men.
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Culture & Religion

Part-time work is humane and should be respected and encouraged

Who would prefer a 30-hour work week? A lot of people, it turns out.

I woke up on a recent Tuesday morning and, while my husband got ready for work, I fixed some not-quite-healthy breakfast for the kids, harangued them until they brushed their teeth and put on shoes and socks, and drove them to school.

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Personal Growth

Burnout is now officially a medically-recognized syndrome

Medical science finally acknowledges what workers have known for years.

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  • The World Health Organization has finally declared burnout a real syndrome with medical consequences.
  • The condition, discussed in medical literature since the '70s, is well known and has affected millions.
  • Treating burnout isn't so simple, and requires organizational changes.
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Mind & Brain

Not having children is another choice we should be discussing

In her new documentary, Maxine Trump tackles the topic of choosing not to procreate.

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  • Maxine Trump's forthcoming documentary, To Kid Or Not To Kid, investigates why women choose not to have children.
  • Twenty percent of women are making this choice, Trump says, which is not a small minority.
  • Climate change and an inability to find a suitable partner are top reasons for this decision.
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Culture & Religion

Losing sleep over rude colleagues? Build a 'psychological buffer.'

Your co-workers could be causing your insomnia.

  • A new study has shown the reasons why incivility at work causes sleep problems such as insomnia.
  • Negative health problems associated with workplace stress include cardiovascular disease, negative mood, and increased blood pressure.
  • The researchers suggest creating a "psychological buffer" between you and your workplace through a variety of techniques.
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Surprising Science