Found in New Mexico: A tiny cousin of the T-Rex

A high-schooler's dig experience writes a new chapter in T-Rex history.

Image source: Artist's conception by Andrey Atuchin/Virginia Tech
  • The bones he found in New Mexico remained unidentified for 20 years.
  • Suskityrannus hazelae turns out to be a diminutive predecessor to the "king lizard."
  • The tiny terror is the ultimate "citizen scientist" victory.
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Surprising Science
She wouldn't last a second.

Who can forget the nail-biting scene in Jurassic Park when an escaped T-Rex, in the middle of a thunderstorm, proceeds to turn over and tear apart a Range Rover with two children trapped inside? Movie magic and real science don't often intersect. So, is this what would really happen, or is Hollywood just ramping up the drama? And how strong was a T. rex's bite anyway? Scientists now know. And the truth is, this terrifying predator retains its reputation. The jaw strength of a T-Rex contained nearly 8,000lbs (3,629kg) of force.

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Culture & Religion