7 of the most interesting fictional drugs

From the cosmic blast into another being's mind, to rolling bliss or obedient mind-slavery, fictional drugs have it all.

  • Fictional drugs are a major part of the lore and foundation for many science fiction stories.
  • The unique effects they have on their characters is an interesting new way to explore important issues.
  • Many of these fictional drugs are synonymous with the stories that have been told.
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Can a party drug stop the increasing rate of suicide?

Ketamine is showing promise in alleviating suicidal thoughts.

Photo by Sarthak Navjivan / Unsplash
  • The popular party drug has shown promise in stopping suicidal thoughts in a number of small clinical studies.
  • First synthesized in 1962, the anesthetic was used to treat Vietnam War soldiers in the early seventies.
  • Though the accompanying hallucinations are a roadblock to widespread therapy, innovations in psychiatry are necessary.
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7 of the best psychedelic books ever written

Turn on, tune in, and drop out and into a good psychedelic book.

  • Psychedelic literature contains some of the richest prose and musings on the human condition.
  • A great deal of these books hail from the 20th century.
  • These are gateway books to a rich and other worldly adventure
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A New Study Finds a Psychedelic Treatment for Depression, with a Side of Mushrooms

A new study shows that psilocybin can "reset" the brain and put depression in the rear-view mirror. 

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Depression is one of the most common medical conditions afflicting the world today. However, despite its familiarity, treatments are still wanting. Most common antidepressants are considered to have a low to moderate effect on typical cases. The search for more effective ways to treat depression is of great importance—depression costs a trillion dollars (!) in lost productivity each year and takes the lives of 2-7% of those who suffer from it.  

A new study suggests that an effective drug has been under our noses for some time... magic mushrooms.

In a study from the Imperial College in London, nineteen patients were given two incrementally larger doses of psilocybin a week apart. MRI scans were taken on the brains of the patients before and after the trips. It was found that the drugs had the effect of reducing and then increasing the amount of blood flow to and changing the activity levels of differing regions of the brain, some of which are associated with depressive symptoms.

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You may have heard of a new kind of therapy from your more “new age” friends, “Sensory Deprivation Tanks”. While it sounds like a form of torture that might have been used at Guantanamo Bay, many people swear to its benefits. Boldly going into the void to gaze into the abyss for an hour or two.

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