How millennials can become a successful generation

Millennials, engage! It's the reason you keep losing to baby boomers.

  • Millennials keep waiting for technology to fix their problems, but they can improve their quality of life now through voting and civic engagement.
  • Baby boomers participate in politics and turn up to vote at much higher rates, so their priorities dominate the political system. (The median member of Congress is 59 years old. That's bad.)
  • Removing roadblocks to voting will help millennials realize their political power so they can vote for issues that affect them most, like climate change policy, raising wages for workers, and closing the wealth gap.

Millennials buy the things their parents did — but they're much poorer

Baby boomers seem to have had an advantage in nearly every financial metric compared to millennials, according to a new study from the Federal Reserve.

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  • Millennials earn less, own fewer assets and have more debt than previous generations.
  • The fact that millennials' spending habits differ from previous generations is best explained by lower earnings and less wealth, rather than changing tastes.
  • Some millennials might be too optimistic about their ability to retire early — or on time.
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How bad is income inequality? Millennials may be the new peasants.

A new Credit Suisse report shows 27% growth since 2008 in the world’s wealth, with a disproportionately large share going to the already wealthy.

(CREDIT SUISSE RESEARCH INSTITUTE)

Unless you're one of a fortunate handful of people, it may surprise you to learn that the world's economy has not only recovered from the global financial meltdown of 2008, but has grown 27% since then, to $280 trillion, according to a new report from Credit Suisse Research Institute. (All graphics in this article are by Credit Suisse, and all figures are presented as USD or percentages.)

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A temporary marriage makes more sense than marriage for life

Most marriages end in resentment. Why should longevity be the sole marker of a successful marriage?


 

 

Angelina Jolie Pitt and Brad Pitt attend the WSJ Magazine 2015 Innovator Awards on November 4, 2015. (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for WSJ)

In November 1891, the British sexologist Havelock Ellis married the writer and lesbian Edith Lees. He was 32 and a virgin. And since he was impotent, they never consummated their union. After their honeymoon, the two lived separately in what he called an open marriage. The union lasted until Lees’ death in 1916. 

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Young Americans are ditching democracy, say Harvard researchers

Democracy needs a new PR team. Polls about the way US millennials view democracy seem shocking, but analyzing their reasoning brings about an unsettling truth. 

Photo by Monika Graff/Getty Images
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