New study argues that migrating from cities, not travel bans, slows spread of disease

Of course, it's all about where you move. The authors argue that it needs to be less populous regions.

Credit: Christian Schwier / Adobe Stock
  • Moving from densely-populated urban regions is more effective in stopping the spreading of disease than closing borders.
  • Two researchers from Spain and Italy ran 10,000 simulations to discover that travel bans are ultimately ineffective.
  • Smaller cities might suffer high rates of infection, but the nation overall could benefit from this model.
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Mexican cave contains signs of human visitors from 30,000 years ago

Archaeologists suggest this may have been the Americas' "oldest hotel."

Image source: Devlin A. Gandy/St. John's College, University of Cambridge
  • Scientists have found ancient tools as well as plant and animal remains in a high-altitude cave.
  • The site is dated to 30,000 years ago, pushing back estimates of the first humans to arrive in the Americas by 15,000 years.
  • There is no sign these mysterious people remain in the modern gene pool.

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What Explains the Bursts of Innovation in the Archaeological Record?

A new paper suggests population size and migration explain the sudden bursts of innovation seen 50,000 years ago.

Immigrants Must Learn English and Take Allegiance Oath, Says Parliamentary Report

A report by UK's parliamentary committee tackles the issue of non-integration in the country's Muslim communities. 

Immigrants into the UK should swear an oath of allegiance and be made to learn English, concluded the Parliament's new group on social integration, which has representatives from all parties.

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Who Is Responsible for the Refugee Crisis, and Who Must Act?

Slavoj Žižek examines the situation out of which refugees are created, and criticizes conservatives and liberals alike for their "conspiracy theories".

How did we get to this refugee crisis? Newton’s Third Law. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. It’s something we may not consciously clock as we hear news and see devastating photographs of migrants crossing dangerous waters in crowded boats, fleeing for their lives. Why is this happening? If you rewind the history of these countries, tracing political event to event, you’ll find the firestarter – and more often than not, it's a long arm that has reached past its own border to interfere in another country.

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