We can improve politics in America. Here’s how.

Here's how to have a healthier relationship with politics.

  • "[T]he single healthiest thing most of us can do for our relationship with politics and for politics would be to deemphasize our connection to national politics and reemphasize our connection to state and local politics," says Ezra Klein.
  • The media has become overwhelmingly nationalized. To improve your relationship with politics, and to improve politics in general, be intentional about your informational ecosystem.
  • Klein recommends reconstructing your news diet so it doesn't overwhelmingly feature national politics, rather sign up for local newsletters, subscribe to your local paper, and get involved in community politics rather than yelling at cable TV or lashing out on Twitter.
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Black News Channel to air 24-7 content 'by' and 'for' African Americans

It's the first American news channel to focus on African-American experiences.

Black News Channel
  • The channel aims to fill a "void" in mainstream media by telling stories and covering issues that matter to African Americans, according to the channel's website.
  • BNC will feature all-black on-air talent, and it aims to be nonpartisan.
  • Some have questioned how African Americans will respond to the channel, which launched Feb. 10.
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Neil deGrasse Tyson: How the 24/7 news cycle compromises science

The race to be first in science journalism is hurting science.

  • Journalists writing about science have become more science fluent over the past 20 years, but the need to be first and the practice of giving equal exposure to opposing views regardless of scientific evidence (e.g. climate change) has been detrimental to the public's understanding of the facts.
  • Reporting on science from the "frontier" doesn't provide the full picture because it doesn't give scientists time to verify and re-verify the results of experiments.
  • Journalists have more power than scientists when it comes to disseminating information, so it's their inherent responsibility to get the facts right.
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Neil deGrasse Tyson: How science literacy can save us from the internet

If you understand when and how to ask questions, you possess an effective inoculation against charlatans.

  • The internet has become a tool to tribalize us, a place where opinions become identities in a fight to the death of who's right and who's wrong.
  • As information continues to flow in, many of us lack the training to effectively sort opinion from fact. This leads to widespread disinformation.
  • We need science literacy. With an understanding of how things work, or how to question how things work, we empower ourselves to discover the truth.
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The more we see fake news, the more likely we are to share it

Research has found that previously encountered information feels more "fluent."

Luis Davilla/Cover/Getty Images

Over the last few years, so-called "fake news" — purposefully untrue misinformation spread online — has become more and more of a concern.

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