New AI can identify you by your dancing “fingerprint”

We each have a way of moving to music that is so unique a computer can use it to identify us.

Photo by David Redfern / Staff via Getty Images
  • The way we dance to music is so signature to an individual that a computer can now identify us by our unique dancing "fingerprint" with over 90 percent accuracy.
  • The AI had a harder time identifying dancers who were trying to dance to metal and jazz music.
  • Researchers say they are interested in what the results of this study reveal about human response to music, rather than potential surveillance uses.
Keep reading Show less

Who decides whether art is ‘good’ or ‘bad’?

Hierarchies of taste exist in our society, but their roots often reflect more than just the quality of work.

  • "Taste" in art and entertainment can often represent societal hierarchies, prejudices, and inequalities.
  • Part of the job of a critic is to refuse categorization of art as "high" or "low."
  • By challenging and redefining these assumptions, critics can level the playing field to include work from all walks of life.
Keep reading Show less

Amy Winehouse's hologram is set to tour in 2019

The money will go to her foundation, but is the tour really in the 'Back to Black' chanteuse's best interest?

Chris Christoforou/Redferns
  • Winehouse died of alcohol poisoning in 2011 at the age of 27.
  • Los Angeles company BASE Hologram is set to put the show together, with a reported tour next year...
  • ... but many of her fans aren't happy with the news.
Keep reading Show less

Brains of jazz musicians have superior flexibility, study finds

Does what kind of music you play alter the benefits you get by playing it?

Photo: Aarón Blanco Tejedor on Unsplash

We've talked before about how learning to play music is great for your brain. By fostering better connections between different regions of the brain, playing music can help promote neural development and can support memory, spatial reasoning, and verbal intelligence. The studies that demonstrate these benefits rarely focus on the sort of music played, however, leaving it possible that the genre played has some influence as well.

Keep reading Show less

Guys with more testosterone like 'sophisticated' music less

A new study find a connection between having more testosterone and not liking classical, jazz, or avant-garde music. 

Revenge of the Nerds

A new study just published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences from Hirokazu Doi and Kazuyuki Shinohara of Nagasaki University asserts that men with more testosterone in their saliva are less likely to enjoy sophisticated music: jazz, classical and avant-garde.

Keep reading Show less