Here's how the world picks sides in the Venezuela crisis

Worryingly, these are not just two random collections of countries, but two blocs with a lot of pre-existing enmity.

Image: Wikipedia
  • The U.S. has urged the world to 'pick sides' in Venezuela's constitutional crisis.
  • This map shows which countries continue to support Maduro, and which ones have thrown their weight behind Guaidó.
  • Could this be the first intimation of a new Cold War – or worse?
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Strange Maps

When America polices the world, everybody loses

America treats the world like a board game. That's a problem.

  • Make no mistake, says Jeffrey Sachs, America is an empire. The end of World War I and the Treaty of Versailles put the United States on a trajectory to exercise political control over foreign governments and topple world leaders on a whim, which, Sachs reminds us, is quite crazy.
  • "Remember when President Obama said Assad must go in Syria?" says Sachs. "I scratched my head and said: How can an American president say that the Syrian president must go?"
  • When America gets topple-happy, the result is catastrophe — just look at Syria, Libya, Iraq, Iran. Overreach of power by the United States destabilizes global politics, threatens U.S. national security, and sets a ticking time bomb for violence and civil war. This kind of foreign policy is doomed to fail.
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Videos

Why the Nazis were obsessed with finding the lost city of Atlantis

The Nazis actively searched for Atlantis, seeing it as important to their mythology.

  • The mythical city of Atlantis was first mentioned in Plato's writings.
  • Top Nazis, including Heimlich Himmler, tried to find the city through expeditions.
  • The island was key to Nazi thinking about the "Aryan race".
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Culture & Religion

Why the World May Be Safe with More Nuclear Weapons, Not Fewer

What's really involved in snuffing out a country’s nuclear capabilities—and is that the right war to be waging?

Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, and Kim Jong Un.

The United States tries hard to keep nuclear weapons away from countries it considers foes. Given how close the world came to nuclear armageddon during the Cold War, and recent threats from so-called “rogue states" like North Korea, it may seem like an essential goal. But America's strategy for thwarting nuclear proliferation may be reaching a point where the costs outweigh the benefits.

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