Being gay in Scientology: How Michelle LeClair got out

High-level official LeClair suppressed her sexuality for decades. Now that she's out, she's speaking up.

MILAN, ITALY - OCTOBER 31: A detailed view of the new Scientology Church is seen on the opening day on October 31, 2015 in Milan, Italy. The five-story, four-building, 258-windows, former headquarters of Philips and computer company Sun has been converted into a 10,000 square meter Scientology church and will be the largest of its kind in the world. (Photo by Awakening/Getty Images)
  • Michelle LeClair survived rape, violence, and surveillance, and is now speaking out against the Church of Scientology.
  • In her new memoir, Perfectly Clear, she details her harrowing story.
  • The church promotes a culture of submission and fear, she says, and is seeking new avenues to retain members.
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Scientists Link 2 Genes to Homosexuality in Men

Scientists identify for the first time two specific genes that may foster a predisposition for being gay in men.

(SYDA PRODUCTIONS via SHUTTERSTOCK)

Anyone choosing sides in the nature vs. nurture conversation should be reasonably convinced by now that life is not so simple, and, that behavior is unlikely to be the product of one or the other (nature, or nurture) alone. It’s been understood for some time that male homosexuality has a genetic component, but now for the first time, two specific gene variations have been found to be more common in gay men, suggesting a specific genetic influence on sexual preference. It's worth mentioning from the onset here that, unfortunately, as with many other areas of human-biology research, there have been more studies of gay men than women and so less is known about the influence of genes on women’s sexual orientation.

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