Watch: Why Captain Marvel is the superhero 2018 needs

It's the first time a female superhero has ever scored her own film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Brie Larson as Captain Marvel. (Image: Marvel Entertainment)
  • Brie Larson stars as Carol Danvers, better known by her alias Captain Marvel.
  • Captain Marvel is the first female superhero to land her own film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • The movie promises something of an origin story for Nick Fury, played by Samuel L. Jackson.
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How Hollywood blurs the line between workplace jokes and harassment

Hollywood writer's rooms are notorious boys clubs: men often outnumber the women by 8 to 1. Nell Scovell has been defying that statistic her entire career.

Hollywood writer's rooms are notorious boys clubs: men often outnumber the women by 8 to 1. TV writer Nell Scovell has defied that depressing statistic her entire career. She's written for an incredible list of shows: Friends, Late Night with David Letterman, The Simpsons, just to name a few. Here, she talks about a time in the Friends room where a lewd joke was taken a little too far — but also sparked an idea for an entire episode of the show. Nell's new book is the hilarious and illuminating Just the Funny Parts: ...And a Few Hard Truths About Sneaking into the Hollywood Boy's Club.

Fantasy-Industrial Complex: How America Got Lost Inside a Dream

Why does America confuse fantasy for reality, in pop culture and in politics? Kurt Andersen can pinpoint the moment it happened.

The start of the 20th century was the birth of a strange new reality in the United States. The advent of the moving image, of Hollywood and sudden celebrity, caused a quantum shift in how Americans thought about the experience of life. Actors were elevated to the status of superheroes and demigods, and those left in the obscurity of the masses began to desire that elusive privilege: fame. But where America really went haywire, author Kurt Andersen explains, is when the cult of celebrity and the cult of capitalism merged: it was the opening of Disneyland in 1955. A bizarre reality where advertising met animation. You could buy real wares, from fake characters, in real stores, with make-believe themes. "What happened in Disneyland... did not stay there," says Andersen. From Mickey Mouse all the way to the White House, Anderson doesn't find it at all surprising that Americans might have a hard time telling what's true from what's false. He calls it the fantasy-industrial complex, and it might just be America's beautifully branded nightmare. Kurt Andersen's new book is Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History.