In France, ancient forests are resurging — growing bigger every year

France's forests are even creeping up on their major cities.

Photo credit: Tim de Waele / Getty Images
  • Forests account for over 31 percent of France's land.
  • While most of the world is losing woodland to farmland, France is gaining.
  • France has both a public and private effort working on reforesting rural and urban areas.
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High in the Alps, where it's 'not supposed to melt,' a rare glacial pond has been discovered

It is rare for them to form, nonetheless reach this size.

BRYAN MESTRE INSTAGRAM
  • Climbing instructor discovers a glacial "lake" high in the Alps.
  • A glacial meltwater lake this size is usually a rare occurrence.
  • French glaciologists are concerned that climate change could create more dangerous lakes like these in the future.
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France will close all its coal power stations by 2021

French president Emmanuel Macron recently announced plans to close all of the country's coal-fired power plants two years ahead of schedule.

French President Emmanuel Macron — Photo: Ludovic Martin/Getty

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How Traveling Abroad Changes Your Outlook on the World for the Better

Considering that the United States remains the world's only superpower, that begs the question: How informed are Americans when it comes to their country's vast global power?

A map showing how North American media cover global events. (Qatar Computing Research Institute)
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When Paris Doesn't Meet Expectations, Some Seek Hospitalization for Syndrome

Paris, France is just too real for some tourists to handle. This results in Japanese tourists getting sick, and seeking therapy because of unmet expectations. 

Japanese Tourist with Baby (Wikimedia)

Paris Syndrome sounds like a condition a college freshman that has read too many Jane Austen books might develop. While the name implies something young and idealized, it can be a very serious disorder that, in the tourist season of 2011, affected twenty tourists visiting the city of lights, according to The Atlantic.

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