3 Mental Strategies to Help You Build a Regular Exercise Routine

A Duke University study that found over 40 percent of our actions aren’t actually decisions, but habits. Here's how to build good ones. 

Chocolate—the key to working out, says NY Times journalist Charles Duhigg. While I’m apt to reply, yes, chocolate is the key to most everything, Duhigg is specifically addressing a way to “trick your brain” into getting fitter. For those lacking the motivation to hit the trail or get into the gym, chocolate just might be the answer. 

Keep reading Show less

Why Crawling Like a Toddler Might Be the Best New Exercise Trend in Ages

Fitness experts are praising the benefits of crawling. 

Fitness crazes come and go, often involving special equipment and strange diets. But a new approach that’s gaining popularity is something anyone can relate to. It involves crawling. Yes, the kind of crawling on all fours you used to do as a child. 

Keep reading Show less

What Happens to Your Brain When You Stop Exercising?

A new study shows that cerebral blood flow within the left and right hippocampus significantly decreases after just 10 days of without exercise.

Runners make their way through a Brooklyn neighborhood during the New York City Marathon November 6, 2005 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

One persistent question has echoed for decades in regards to exercise: how much? Current government guidelines suggest either 150 minutes of moderate aerobic intensity or 75 minutes of high aerobic intensity every week. It is also suggested that these minutes are spread out through the week. One two-and-a-half hour jog on Sunday is not optimal if you’re not getting your heart rate up at all over the following six days.

Keep reading Show less