New evidence shows Neanderthals got 'surfer's ear'

Our relationship with water still matters.

Photo: Eric Cabanis/AFP/Getty Images
  • According to new research, half of Neanderthal skulls studied had exostoses — aka "surfer's ear."
  • The condition is common in mammals that spend a lot of time in water.
  • Though today we are largely disconnected from nature, the consequences of our relationship to it are still felt.
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How a 1,000-Year-Old Religious Edict Shaped the Modern Chicken

Research suggests that a religious edict from the Catholic Church shaped the evolution of the modern chicken.

Confused chicken. [Photo: Matt Davis via flickr.com/photos/26279436@N02/]

Chicken is one of the most consumed meats in the world. The U.S. alone consumes 8 billion chickens per year — about 25 birds per every meat-eater in the country. But just 1,000 years ago, chicken was a relatively rare dish.

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The Evolutionary Biology of Dreams, Explained

Dreams might be a whole lot sexier than we thought – but not because of their narrative content. Neurologist Patrick McNamara's theory links the biological changes in our brains during sleep to human's inherent desire to procreate.

A scene from Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Image: Focus Features)

Carl Jung battled his one-time friend and mentor, Sigmund Freud, on a number of topics, though perhaps none as perniciously as dreaming. An entire cottage industry of depth psychology and journaling workshops grew out of Jung’s theories of individuation—integrating the conscious and unconscious. To Jung, dreams—the primal material of the unconscious—unlocked humanity’s archetypal code, revealing more than they concealed, in direct contradiction to Freud’s ideas.

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