Newly discovered mineral petrovite could revolutionize batteries

A mineral made in a Kamchatka volcano may hold the answer to cheaper batteries, find scientists.

Credit: Filatov et al.
  • Russian scientists discover a new mineral in the volcanic area of Kamchatka in the country's far east.
  • The mineral dubbed "petrovite" can be utilized to power sodium-ion batteries.
  • Batteries based on salt would be cheaper to produce than lithium-ion batteries.
Keep reading Show less

Electricity and fear: The trouble with nuclear energy

Although everyone knows that coal-based energy is a thing of the past, declarations about nuclear power plants somehow do not want to enter into force.

Photo by Viktor Kiryanov on Unsplash

No other power-generating device raises as much concern as the nuclear reactor. Because of this, until recently the future of the entire energy sector has been determined by its past.

Keep reading Show less
Credit: beysim via AdobeStock
  • The International Energy Agency is an intergovernmental organization that advises member nations on issues related to energy and the environment.
  • In its annual report, the IEA reported that the cost of solar is dropping more rapidly than previously thought, providing some parts of the world with historically cheap electricity.
  • The IEA predicted that, over the next decade, renewables will meet 80 percent of global electricity demand growth, while the demand for oil will peak.
Keep reading Show less

Chemists propose spinach as a better, cheaper battery catalyst

While it's always been a boon to Popeye's "muskles," it looks like spinach may also have a role to play in clean future batteries.

Credit: Ataly/Shutterstock
  • Scientists are seeking sustainable, clean chemicals for use in future fuel cell and metal-air batteries.
  • Platinum is the current go-to substance for battery cathode catalysts, but it poses a number of problems, including high cost and instability.
  • Chemists at American University have developed a new high-performance catalyst from simple spinach, although its preparation as a catalyst is anything but simple.
Keep reading Show less

Nano diamond batteries have one company all charged-up

Utilizing nuclear waste converted to diamonds, the company's batteries will reportedly last thousands of years in some cases.

Image source: Oleksii Biriukov/Shutterstock
  • Nuclear reactor parts converted to radioactive carbon-14 diamonds produce energy.
  • To keep them safe, the carbon-14 diamonds are encased in a second protective diamond layer.
  • The company predicts batteries for personal devices could last about nine years.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast