Musicians and their audiences show synchronized patterns of brain activity

Researchers observed "inter-brain coherence" (IBC) — a synchronisation in brain activity — between a musician and the audience.

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When a musician is playing a piece, and the audience is enjoying it, they can develop physical synchronies. Both might tap their feet, sway their bodies, or clap their hands.
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How geocachers navigate fear in the urban woods

Because geocaches are always hidden out of sight, players often have to behave in out-of-the-ordinary ways to reach them.

Photo by Kyle Peyton on Unsplash

On a drizzly Saturday morning in June 2018, I found myself kneeling on the edge of a wooden boardwalk in Melbourne's northern suburbs.

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You know what it's like to be sick. You feel fatigued, maybe a little depressed, less hungry than usual, more easily nauseated and perhaps more sensitive to pain and cold.

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The cabbage roll epiphany: Our best chance at depolarizing the United States

If ever there was a food that holds a lesson for building bridges in a fractured America, it's the cabbage roll.

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  • Dr. Kurt Gray of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill unpacks a psychological and political phenomenon: reactive devaluation.
  • This negative phenomenon is driving polarization in the U.S.. The good news? It has an equally powerful counterpart: benevolence.
  • Understanding how humans create meaning in the world is the key to a more unified and a more rational America.
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Researchers were surprised to find bungee jumpers' cognition was enhanced after a jump

Think adrenaline leaves you unable to think clearly? Think again.

It's well-established in psychology that intense emotion and physiological arousal interfere with people's ability to think straight.

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