The impact of stress on orcas held in captivity

A new study lays out the case for the damaging effects of stress on orcas living in tanks.

Image source: Thanaphong Araveeporn/Shutterstock
  • There are currently around 60 orcas living in concrete tanks globally.
  • Orcas' brain structures and behaviors strongly suggest they are smart, emotional, self-aware beings.
  • The study provides compelling evidence that the stresses inherent in captivity do damage to these naturally free-roaming cetaceans.

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Anthony Scaramucci: How entrepreneurs can manage fear in times of crisis

What's the worst thing that could happen, and can you live with that?

  • Anthony Scaramucci isn't afraid to admit his failures as an entrepreneur. The founder and managing partner of investment firm SkyBridge Capital says it's the journey that matters, and that being an entrepreneur means accepting that some things, including successes and failures, are out of your control.
  • A hard but necessary question that entrepreneurs have to ask themselves is if they can live with the worst case scenario.
  • In a time of crisis, Scaramucci's advice is to clear your mind, accept all possible outcomes, and to dial down fear-based instincts so that you focus on being aggressive in business.
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Musicians and their audiences show synchronized patterns of brain activity

Researchers observed "inter-brain coherence" (IBC) — a synchronisation in brain activity — between a musician and the audience.

Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash
When a musician is playing a piece, and the audience is enjoying it, they can develop physical synchronies. Both might tap their feet, sway their bodies, or clap their hands.
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How geocachers navigate fear in the urban woods

Because geocaches are always hidden out of sight, players often have to behave in out-of-the-ordinary ways to reach them.

Photo by Kyle Peyton on Unsplash

On a drizzly Saturday morning in June 2018, I found myself kneeling on the edge of a wooden boardwalk in Melbourne's northern suburbs.

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Feeling sick is an emotion meant to help you get better faster

Is feeling wretched actually helpful?

Photofusion/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

You know what it's like to be sick. You feel fatigued, maybe a little depressed, less hungry than usual, more easily nauseated and perhaps more sensitive to pain and cold.

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