Evolution has robbed us of horse-sized bunnies

The size of rabbits and hares has long been evolutionarily constrained by competitors roughly their size.

Credit: zcy/Gabi Moisa/Adobe Stock/Big Think
  • Rabbits, hares, and pikas are not as varied in size as other similar animals such as rodents, which can be both far bigger and far smaller.
  • Scientists at Kyoto University examined the fossil record to figure out why.
  • They found that the smallest hoofed mammals always predict the size of the largest rabbits.
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Selfish sperm genes 'poison' the competition for the win

Imagine poisoning your rival and yourself and giving only yourself the antidote.

Credit: ThorstenSchmitt/Adobe Stock
  • The t-haplotype alleles play dirty when it comes to reaching the egg first.
  • In order for their nefarious scene to work, just the right amount of a certain protein has to be present.
  • Experiments with mouse sperm reveal the whole complicated story.
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Short men are indirectly aggressive toward taller men, study finds

The study shows when the 'Napoleon complex' is most likely to emerge.

Artist: Andrea Appiani
  • A recent study examined the Napoleon complex through economic games.
  • The results showed that shorter men are more likely than taller men to keep a disproportionate amount of resources for themselves, but only when the other player can't retaliate.
  • The study suggests that the Napoleon complex is most likely to manifest in situations where the shorter man has all the power.
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The Real Story of What Got Us to the Top of the Food Chain

Natural "narrative selection" was key to turning insignificant apes (who had tools for 2 million years) into the species that now dominates the bio-sphere. 

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