Create your breakout moment: Take risks to get the job you really want

By putting yourself out there and overcoming anxieties, you just might land your dream job.

  • When it comes to advancing your career, taking those first steps can be intimidating. Making a big move often incites anxiety and fear surrounding imperfection.
  • Sally Susman, Executive Vice President and Chief Corporate Affairs Officer at Pfizer, reminds that the pursuit of perfection can be the enemy of taking that next step. She urges us to express ambition and embrace rejection, which should be considered a temporary setback — not a death sentence.
  • Go for the bold move, whether that means moving to a new city or entering a new field. Taking the risk could lead to your breakout moment in your career.
Keep reading Show less

Why employees have the upper hand now more than ever before

Today, if a business wants to be successful, it should pay attention to employee fulfillment.

  • Employee satisfaction, as a concept, didn't emerge until the rise of the industrial economy and unionization. If employees were unhappy, management could predict a strike and stoppage of work.
  • Since then, the standard for management has been to consider employee engagement an accurate measure of satisfaction. Instead, research suggests the focus should be employee fulfillment: Do employees have the ability to reflect on and create meaning around their work?
  • Now, in the information economy, employees are often the means of value creation. This provides a unique advantage in which management must consider employee fulfillment in order to remain profitable.
Keep reading Show less

Psychology’s five revelations for finding your true calling

There's a difference between having a harmonious passion and an obsessive one.

Look. You can't plan out your life. What you have to do is first discover your passion – what you really care about.
Barack Obama
Keep reading Show less

Diversity, stereotyping, success: Why being different at work is risky business

Stereotyping isn't about "bad people doing bad things." It's about our subconscious biases, and how they sneak into organizational structures.

Psychologist Valerie Purdie Greenaway is the first African American to be tenured in the sciences at Columbia University, in its entire 263 year history. Despite her celebrated position—and, in fact, perhaps because of it—she still struggles with perception, subtle stereotyping, and the enormous stakes of being one of few women of color in a leadership role. Here, Valerie Purdie Greenaway speaks with diversity and inclusion expert Jennifer Brown about being "the only" in a workplace, whether that is along lines of gender, race, culture, or sexual orientation, and how organizations and individuals can do more to recognize and address their biases. That also means letting go of the idea that stereotyping is a malevolent case of "bad people doing bad things." What does discrimination really look like day to day? Most of it is subconscious, subtle, and is deeply embedded into the structure of organizations, which can have an impact on performance, mentorship, and staff turnover. Do you recognize any of your own behavior in this discussion? This live conversation was part of a recent New York panel on diversity, inclusion, and collaboration at work.

Hey Bill Nye! What if I’m not a science person?

High school junior Caitlin is worried. She wants to be a scientist but is struggling with it a little bit in school—is there hope for her career?

What do you do if you're a diehard science lover who dreams of one day donning a lab coat professionally, but you're struggling with the work at school? That is Caitlin's predicament—but that's not how Bill Nye sees it. Your school classes may not come naturally to you, but that's because science is a skill, not a talent. No one is born a scientist, it is something you become over time with hard work, and if perhaps biology isn't hitting home with you, you may find your groove in astronomy. Physics isn't for everyone, but chemistry might be your match. The point is, there is a kind of science for everyone. So to change the world as a scientist, here's what you have to do: #1. Don't give up before it's begun. #2. Study hard and get to college. #3. Practice science as a way of thinking (and algebra specifically) to develop abstract thinking skills. #4. Find the field in which you belong, and start to chip away at change. Bill Nye's most recent book is Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World.

Keep reading Show less