Here's why MIT scientists want to develop a robot drinking buddy

It's not just for the lols. If you're up for some soul-searching, they need you to contribute to this MIT research survey...

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I recently had a conversation with a colleague that works with me in the MIT AgeLab. He specializes in AI and machine learning. As we walked and discussed his current work on autonomous vehicles, I asked him, “Where would you like to take your research?” Without missing a beat he responded, “I would like to build a robot that you would want to have a conversation with.”

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What Caused the Big Bang? Consider the Beer Bottle...

For once, beer is going to clarify your understanding. Theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss lays down the empirical evidence for the mechanics of the Big Bang.

It’s near impossible to comprehend the size of our universe without busting a mental cog or spraining your sense of awe. However, the origins of our universe has exactly the opposite problem: it was once mind-bogglingly small — tinier than a single particle. Physicist Lawrence Krauss explains the principle of inflation, and how within the first billionth of a second of the Big Bang, our universe increased in size by a factor of 10 to the 30th—for comparison, that’s the size of a single atom, to the size of a basketball. How did it do this? It involves a ‘frozen’ Higgs field, some cooling, and then an enormous explosion. Krauss uses an analogy we’ve all been at the mercy of: putting a beer in the freezer and forgetting it for a few too many hours. Lawrence Krauss' most recent book is The Greatest Story Ever Told -- So Far: Why Are We Here?.

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What Corona Can Teach Us About Trickle-Down Economics

In spite of rumors, billionaire Corona beer founder Antonino Fernández's estate will not be distributed among the residents of his home town.

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Beer Archaeologist: How Alcohol Shaped Our Civilization

Professor Patrick McGovern, a world authority on ancient alcoholic beverages, describes how alcohol had a profound effect on early societies.

Biomolecular Archaeologist Patrick McGovern AKA The Indiana Jones of Alcohol

Patrick McGovern, a biomolecular archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania, has one of the coolest jobs in the world. Some have called him “the Indiana Jones of Alcohol” or “the beer archaeologist”. What he does is recreate the world's oldest drinks by finding and utilizing organic material at archaeological sites. A world authority on ancient alcoholic beverages, he’s found humanity’s oldest drinks and re-made some of them, like a beer from the legendary King Midas's court and a 9000-year-old Chinese rice and honey drink from the Neolithic period.

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