A teenager finally made relativity and reference frames understandable

A student’s award-winning explanation of relativity and reference frames is the best one yet.

Hillary Diane Andales explains
(HILLARY DIANE ANDALES)

Meet Hillary Diane Andales.


Hillary Diane Andales (BREAKTHROUGH PRIZE)

The 12th grader, who's 18, lives in Tacloban City, Philippines, and made the video below as her entry in the Breakthrough Junior Challenge 2017. Spoiler alert: She won. Small wonder. For any of us struggling to wrap our minds around brain-bending relativity, her video explaining how reference frames work is so simple, so clear, and so very welcome.

(HILLARY DIANE ANDALES)

Such Zen clarity is deceptive: It takes a lot of work. Andales tells Asian Scientist that she went through 20 drafts and about 100 hours of animation and shooting to arrive at the final video. And it doesn't hurt to be brilliant. The teenager, when asked about her plans, says, “Right now, I'm eyeing fundamental or particle physics."

U.S. Navy controls inventions that claim to change "fabric of reality"

Inventions with revolutionary potential made by a mysterious aerospace engineer for the U.S. Navy come to light.

U.S. Navy ships

Credit: Getty Images
Surprising Science
  • U.S. Navy holds patents for enigmatic inventions by aerospace engineer Dr. Salvatore Pais.
  • Pais came up with technology that can "engineer" reality, devising an ultrafast craft, a fusion reactor, and more.
  • While mostly theoretical at this point, the inventions could transform energy, space, and military sectors.
Keep reading Show less

There never was a male fertility crisis

A new study suggests that reports of the impending infertility of the human male are greatly exaggerated.

Sex & Relationships
  • A new review of a famous study on declining sperm counts finds several flaws.
  • The old report makes unfounded assumptions, has faulty data, and tends toward panic.
  • The new report does not rule out that sperm counts are going down, only that this could be quite normal.
Keep reading Show less

Over 40% of workers are considering quitting their jobs

A year of disruptions to work has contributed to mass burnout.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Junior members of the workforce, including Generation Z, are facing digital burnout.
  • 41 percent of workers globally are thinking about handing in their notice, according to a new Microsoft survey.
  • A hybrid blend of in-person and remote work could help maintain a sense of balance – but bosses need to do more.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast