9 heartbreaking Hurricane Michael photos remind us of nature's power

It's the first time a Category 4 hit this region. Ever.

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Prepare yourself: Some of these images are simply gut-wrenching
  • The main landfall area, Mexico Beach, is almost entirely gone
  • Take heed, folks who might face something like it in the future: Many survivors say, "We should have left."

These are just some of the images left behind after hurricane Michael decimated parts of the Florida panhandle; these are from Mexico beach and Panama City, the hardest-hit areas. Some of the survivors are now saying they should have left. 

Tom Bailey walks his bike past a home that was carried across a road and slammed up against a condo complex as Hurricane Michael passed through the area on October 11, 2018 in Mexico Beach, Florida.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Searching for survivors amid the destruction 

Members of the South Florida Search and Rescue team search for survivors in the destruction left after Hurricane Michael passed through the area on October 11, 2018 in Mexico Beach, Florida.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

South Florida Search and Rescue in Mexico Beach, Florida

A member of the South Florida Search and Rescue team searches for survivors in the destruction left after Hurricane Michael passed through the area on October 11, 2018 in Mexico Beach, Florida.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Hurricane Michael completely removed roofs from houses

A member of the South Florida Search and Rescue team searches for survivors in the destruction left after Hurricane Michael passed through the area on October 11, 2018 in Mexico Beach, Florida.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A member of the South Florida Search and Rescue team searches for survivors in the destruction left after Hurricane Michael passed through the area on October 11, 2018 in Mexico Beach, Florida.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A teenager gathering water from a neighbor's fridge

Gavin Conklin, 17, gathers water bottles from a neighbor's refrigerator after Hurricane Michael destroyed the home on October 11, 2018 in Panama City, Florida.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

This woman was inside her home when the hurricane destroyed it

Kathy Coy stands among what is left of her home after Hurricane Michael destroyed it on October 11, 2018 in Panama City, Florida. She said she was in the home when it was blown apart and is thankful to be alive.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Hurricane Michael was the most powerful southern storm in 100+ years

A view of storm damage during Hurricane Michael October 10, 2018 in Panama City, Florida. - Michael slammed into the Florida coast on October 10 as the most powerful storm to hit the southern US state in more than a century as officials warned it could wreak 'unimaginable devastation.'

(Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Water vessels did not survive the storm

Boats that were docked are seen in a pile of rubble after hurricane Michael passed through the downtown area on October 10, 2018 in Panama City, Florida.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A still from the film "We Became Fragments" by Luisa Conlon , Lacy Roberts and Hanna Miller, part of the Global Oneness Project library.

Photo: Luisa Conlon , Lacy Roberts and Hanna Miller / Global Oneness Project
Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • Stories are at the heart of learning, writes Cleary Vaughan-Lee, Executive Director for the Global Oneness Project. They have always challenged us to think beyond ourselves, expanding our experience and revealing deep truths.
  • Vaughan-Lee explains 6 ways that storytelling can foster empathy and deliver powerful learning experiences.
  • Global Oneness Project is a free library of stories—containing short documentaries, photo essays, and essays—that each contain a companion lesson plan and learning activities for students so they can expand their experience of the world.
Keep reading Show less

What the world will look like in the year 250,002,018

This is what the world will look like, 250 million years from now

On Pangaea Proxima, Lagos will be north of New York, and Cape Town close to Mexico City
Surprising Science

To us humans, the shape and location of oceans and continents seems fixed. But that's only because our lives are so short.

Keep reading Show less

Why we must teach students to solve big problems

The future of education and work will rely on teaching students deeper problem-solving skills.

Future of Learning
  • Asking kids 'What do you want to be when you grow up?' is a question that used to make sense, says Jaime Casap. But it not longer does; the nature of automation and artificial intelligence means future jobs are likely to shift and reform many times over.
  • Instead, educators should foster a culture of problem solving. Ask children: What problem do you want to solve? And what talents or passions do you have that can be the avenues by which you solve it?
  • "[T]he future of education starts on Monday and then Tuesday and then Wednesday and it's constant and consistent and it's always growing, always improving, and if we create that culture I think that would bring us a long way," Casap says.
Keep reading Show less

Allosaurus dabbled in cannibalism according to new fossil evidence

These Jurassic predators resorted to cannibalism when hit with hard times, according to a deliciously rare discovery.

Fig 3. Shed lateral tooth of Allosaurus sp. (MWC 5011) found at the Mygatt-Moore Quarry, white arrow indicates the distal denticles.

Stephanie K. Drumheller et.al
Surprising Science
  • Rare fossil evidence of dinosaur cannibalism among the Allosaurus has been discovered.
  • Scientists analyzed dinosaur bones found in the Mygatt-Moore Quarry in western Colorado, paying special attention to bite marks that were present on 2,368 of the bones.
  • It's likely that the predatory carnivore only ate their already-dead peers during times when resources were scarce.
Keep reading Show less
Scroll down to load more…