NASA Is Putting Its Research Papers Online For Free

NASA will be putting most of the research it funds online for free in policy of open access to science.

NASA announced that it’s making most of its publicly-funded research available online free of charge. It’s using a site called Pubspace where you can search peer-reviewed papers resulting from NASA-funded research on a wide variety of topics.


Do you want or need to read studies about the origins of life on Mars? Maybe you’d like to draw your own conclusions about the “Grand challenges in space synthetic biology?” Or learn about exercising in space? Previously you would have had to pay for access to this work, but today is your day as Pubspace already has over 850 articles posted, with more to come.

NASA Chief Scientist Ellen Stofan explained the reasoning involved in releasing the papers to the public:

“Making our research data easier to access will greatly magnify the impact of our research. As scientists and engineers, we work by building upon a foundation laid by others.”

NASA’s move is in response to a general worldwide trend towards making scientific knowledge more available as well as a 2013 directive from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to increase access to their research. NASA’s new policy will be to post all agency-funded research papers on Pubspace within a year of their publication.

The one big exception is any research related to national security.

In a press release, NASA Deputy Administrator Dava Newman further expounded on the far-reaching implications of the new scientific openness:

“At NASA, we are celebrating this opportunity to extend access to our extensive portfolio of scientific and technical publications. Through open access and innovation we invite the global community to join us in exploring Earth, air and space.”

So if you’re up for investigating the workings of “Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance” or have been wondering about the cardiovascular disease mortality of the Apollo lunar astronauts, you know where to go.

Plants have awareness and intelligence, argue scientists

Research in plant neurobiology shows that plants have senses, intelligence and emotions.

Getty Images
Surprising Science
  • The field of plant neurobiology studies the complex behavior of plants.
  • Plants were found to have 15-20 senses, including many like humans.
  • Some argue that plants may have awareness and intelligence, while detractors persist.
Keep reading Show less

Vaping changes blood vessels after one use, even without nicotine

E-cigarettes may be safer than traditional cigarettes, but they come with their own risks.


John Keeble
/GETTY
Surprising Science
  • A new study used an MRI machine to examine how vaping e-cigarettes affects users' cardiovascular systems immediately after inhalation.
  • The results showed that vaping causes impaired circulation, stiffer arteries and less oxygen in their blood.
  • The new study adds to a growing body of research showing that e-cigarettes – while likely safer than traditional cigarettes – are far from harmless.
Keep reading Show less

Space is dead: A challenge to the standard model of quantum mechanics

Since the idea of locality is dead, space itself may not be an aloof vacuum: Something welds things together, even at great distances.

Videos
  • Realists believe that there is an exactly understandable way the world is — one that describes processes independent of our intervention. Anti-realists, however, believe realism is too ambitious — too hard. They believe we pragmatically describe our interactions with nature — not truths that are independent of us.
  • In nature, properties of Particle B may be depend on what we choose to measure or manipulate with Particle A, even at great distances.
  • In quantum mechanics, there is no explanation for this. "It just comes out that way," says Smolin. Realists struggle with this because it would imply certain things can travel faster than light, which still seems improbable.
Keep reading Show less