Stay-at-home moms work the equivalent of 2.5 full-time jobs, survey finds

This is no surprise to moms everywhere. Raise glass of wine for all of the caregivers out there! Cheers.

Infographic on paid maternity leave. (UN WOMEN)
Sources: Progress of the World's Women 2015-2016, UN Women; ILO Maternity Protection Convention No. 183, International Labour Organization

Moms who take care of the kids are working basically 2.5 jobs—for free. 


And it must be said: stay-at-home dads are not excluded. The survey gauges the amount of time spent in some aspect of both child care and housework, including making food for the tribe. 

2,000 American moms of children aged five to 12 were surveyed for this study by the company Welch's. Some of the results:

- Average daily start time: 6:23 a.m.

- Average end time (when they are officially “off the clock”): 8:31 p.m.

- The average mom gets just 1 hour and 7 minutes to herself every day

- 4-in-10 moms felt like their lives were a never-ending series of tasks, every day of the week

That adds up to a 14-hour shift, every day of the week. 

Not surprisingly, coffee, wine, naps, and the ability to quickly adopt an angry voice were some of the things they couldn’t live without. Family helping out or and other trustworthy babysitter help also topped the list. 

“When it comes to making decisions around a family’s diet and overall nutrition the burden often lands with Mom who, as the survey shows, has very little time to spare. The ability to offer a quick snack or beverage that she can be reassured is nutritious for the whole family is something that can’t be underestimated in making a difference to her day.” says Casey Lewis, MS, RD and Health & Nutrition Lead at Welch's. 

According to the UN, unpaid work is a crucial support for insufficient social services and bolsters the economy. Its value is estimated to be between 10 and 39 percent of a nation's GDP.

Mother’s Day 2018 is on Sunday, May 13 this year; time for some spoiling, don’t you think?

Source: UN Women

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