Elon Musk Wants to Make Sure AI is Developed for the Benefit of Humanity (Not Its Destruction)

So, he helped fund a nonprofit.

Elon Musk Wants to Make Sure AI is Developed for the Benefit of Humanity (Not Its Destruction)


Elon Musk wants to protect humanity from the robot apocalypse. Artificial intelligence has been growing at a rapid pace thanks in part to deep learning, but the world's brightest minds worry.

Facebook and Google have announced big plans to advance AI in their respective research divisions. But Musk and many others want to make sure AI is built to benefit humanity, which is why he and other prominent tech figures are helping to launch OpenAI, a nonprofit organization.

The organization believes it's “important to have a leading research institution which can prioritize a good outcome for all over its own self-interest.”

Below, futurist and entrepreneur Michael Vassar runs through a worst-case scenario:

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Alien spaceships.

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Surprising Science
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Because of a dramatic rise in COVID-19 cases, the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2021 Olympics will unfold in a stadium absent the eyes, ears and voices of a once-anticipated 68,000 ticket holders from around the world.

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Bad at math? Blame your neurotransmitters

A new brain imaging study explored how different levels of the brain's excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters are linked to math abilities.

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