The Daily Rate For Wearing An Ad On Your Thigh: US$121

Since a Tokyo-based PR firm announced the campaign earlier this year, more than 3,000 Japanese women have signed up. There are some conditions, though: Participants must be over 18, relatively active online, and dedicated miniskirt wearers.

What's the Latest Development?


Earlier this year, Tokyo-based PR firm Wit Inc. announced that it would pay Japanese women to wear large advertising stickers on the middle of one thigh. Since then, more than 3,000 have signed up, and now they are earning up to US$121 for each day they perform as a literal walking billboard. Some of the ad campaigns that received the skin treatment, so to speak, have been for the movie "Ted" and the band Green Day. 

What's the Big Idea?

Particularly in a country like Japan, where advertising is ubiquitous, new and creative attempts to cut through the noise are always appreciated. Wit Inc. CEO Hidenori Atsumi said in a television interview that the thigh is "an absolutely perfect place to put an advertisement, as this is what guys are eager to look at and girls are eager to expose." However, not every woman can participate: Among other requirements, interested candidates must be over 18, have at least 20 friends on social media, and post pictures of themselves wearing the ad. The agency also recommends that they wear miniskirts and long socks to draw attention to the sticker.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

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