Elon Musk is the Concerned Dad in Every Car Commercial

He just wants the best for humanity.

Elon Musk wants to make sure humanity lives and lives better. His whole legacy is built around the idea of making the world a better place. His missions to convert every home to solar and colonize Mars are a testament to his dedication. Musk has taken another step to preserve human life: Meet Model X, a Tesla SUV built to defend its passengers from a biological attack.




Inside the car is a bioweapon defense button in the dash display, which Musk says “gives you hospital-level air quality” when the mode is activated. It pumps up the Model X’s HEPA air filter to maximum, which Musk says is strong enough to rid any toxins from a bioweapon.

The Model X not only protects your loved ones against biological incidents, but also protects against the standard car crash. Musk boasted in the announcement that the Model X has a five-star crash test rating... if there was a sixth star, the Model X would get it.

When it comes to front-end crashes, it's simple calculation of force over distance. The Model X has no gas engine, which, in standard cars, can get pushed into the passenger cabin. The Model X, therefore, has a higher “crumple zone” to absorb and distribute the force of the impact. Musk joked, “It's the difference between jumping into a pool or a pool with a rock in it, so...” 

When it came to the side-pole impact test, the same results held true, beating (what was) the highest-rated SUV.

See the results for yourself:



Likewise, probability of rollover is reduced; and probability of death is reduced from crashes and from inhaling toxic emissions.

Check out the full announcement here.

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Natalie has been writing professionally for about 6 years. After graduating from Ithaca College with a degree in Feature Writing, she snagged a job at PCMag.com where she had the opportunity to review all the latest consumer gadgets. Since then she has become a writer for hire, freelancing for various websites. In her spare time, you may find her riding her motorcycle, reading YA novels, hiking, or playing video games. Follow her on Twitter: @nat_schumaker

Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Staff

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